Complementary Systems of Medicine

(Acupuncture, Acupressure, Alternative medicine or Complementary medicine, Aromatherapy, Ayurveda, Herbal medicine, Homeopathy, Naturopathy, Pranic healing, Reflexology, Rekhi, Siddha, Traditional medicine, Unani, Yoga & Meditation)  

January, 2005

Acupressure:

11193.  Hsieh LL, Kuo CH, Yen MF, Chen TH.  A randomized controlled clinical trial for low back pain treated by acupressure and physical therapy. Prev Med. 2004 Jul;39(1):168-76.

11194.  Shin YH, Kim TI, Shin MS, Juon HS.  Effect of acupressure on nausea and vomiting during chemotherapy cycle for Korean postoperative stomach cancer patients. Cancer Nurs. 2004 Jul-Aug;27(4):267-74.

Acupuncture:

11195.  Cheng TO. Infective endocarditis, cardiac tamponade, and AIDS as serious complications of acupuncture. Arch Intern Med. 2004 Jul 12;164(13):1464.

11196.  Freeman MP, Helgason C, Hill RA. Selected integrative medicine treatments for depression: considerations for women. J Am Med Womens Assoc. 2004 Summer;59(3):216-24. Review.

11197.  Huntley AL, Coon JT, Ernst E. Complementary and alternative medicine for labor pain: a systematic review. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2004 Jul;191(1):36-44. Review.

11198.  Lu AP, Jia HW, Xiao C, Lu QP. Theory of traditional Chinese medicine and therapeutic method of diseases. World J Gastroenterol. 2004 Jul 1;10(13):1854-6. Review.

11199.  Schafer T. Epidemiology of complementary alternative medicine for asthma and allergy in Europe and Germany. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2004 Aug;93(2 Suppl 1):S5-10. Review.

11200.  Sherman KJ, Cherkin DC, Connelly MT, Erro J, Savetsky JB, Davis RB, Eisenberg DM.  Complementary and alternative medical therapies for chronic low back pain: What treatments are patients willing to try? BMC Complement Altern Med. 2004 Jul 19;4(1):9.

11201.  Weiner DK, Ernst E. Complementary and alternative approaches to the treatment of persistent musculoskeletal pain. Clin J Pain. 2004 Jul-Aug;20(4):244-55. Review.

Aromatherapy:

11202.  Crawford GH, Katz KA, Ellis E, James WD. Use of aromatherapy products and increased risk of hand dermatitis in massage therapists. Arch Dermatol. 2004 Aug;140(8):991-6.

Ayurveda:

11203.  Bikshapathi T, Tripathi SN. Bronchial asthma and its management in ayurveda. Aryavaidyan. 2004 Feb - Apr; XVII(3):135 - 143. 

11204.  Das M. The fourth dimension of human self. Aryavaidyan. 2003 Aug - Oct; XVII(1):61-64.

11205.  Shetty BR, Srinivasan K, Bhattathiri PPN. Role of aswagandha and punarnava in Ajasrika rasayana.  Aryavaidyan. 2004 Feb - Apr; XVII(3):179 - 181.  

11206.  Sridurga, Jha CB. Effective wound healing formulations of ayurveda and their pharmaceutical standardization. Aryavaidyan. 2004 Feb - Apr; XVII(3):144 - 148.

11207.  Srikanth N, Dua M, Mishra DK. Management of abnormal involuntary movements of eye lids a case report. Aryavaidyan  2003 Aug - Oct; XVII(1):32-34.

11208.  Thawani V, Kochar N, Khemani C, Hingorani, Ughade S. Efficacy of antidiabetic herbal combination " Glucoin " in diabetes mellitus. Antiseptic. 2004 Feb; 101(2): 70-4.

Herbal Medicine:

11209.  Bielory L.  Complementary and alternative interventions in asthma, allergy, and immunology. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2004 Aug;93(2 Suppl 1):S45-54. Review.

11210.  Dattner AM. Herbal and complementary medicine in dermatology. Dermatol Clin. 2004 Jul;22(3):325-32, vii. Review.

11211.  De Smet PA. Health risks of herbal remedies: an update. Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2004 Jul;76(1):1-17. Review.

11212.  Gyamfi MA, Ohtani II, Shinno E, Aniya Y. Inhibition of glutathione S-transferases by thonningianin A, isolated from the African medicinal herb, Thonningia sanguinea, in vitro. Food Chem Toxicol. 2004 Sep;42(9):1401-8.

11213.  Iwasaki K, Kobayashi S, Chimura Y, Taguchi M, Inoue K, Cho S, Akiba T, Arai H, Cyong JC, Sasaki H. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of the Chinese herbal medicine "ba wei di huang wan" in the treatment of dementia. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2004 Sep;52(9):1518-21.

11214.  Lau CB, Ho CY, Kim CF, Leung KN, Fung KP, Tse TF, Chan HH, Chow MS. Cytotoxic activities of Coriolus versicolor (Yunzhi) extract on human leukemia and lymphoma cells by induction of apoptosis. Life Sci. 2004 Jul 2;75(7):797-808.

11215.  Lennihan B. Homeopathy: natural mind-body healing. J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 2004 Jul;42(7):30-40. Review.

11216.  Yin X, Zhou J, Jie C, Xing D, Zhang Y. Anticancer activity and mechanism of Scutellaria barbata extract on human lung cancer cell line A549. Life Sci. 2004 Sep 17;75(18):2233-44.

Homeopathy:

11217.  Baas C.  The nuts and bolts of homeopathy. Homeopathy. 2004 Jul;93(3):117-8.

11218.  Brien S, Prescott P, Owen D, Lewith G. How do homeopaths make decisions? An exploratory study of inter-rater reliability and intuition in the decision making process. Homeopathy. 2004 Jul;93(3):125-31.

11219.  Elia V, Baiano S, Duro I, Napoli E, Niccoli M, Nonatelli L. Permanent physico-chemical properties of extremely diluted aqueous solutions of homeopathic medicines. Homeopathy. 2004 Jul;93(3):144-50.

11220.  Milgrom LR. Patient-practitioner-remedy (PPR) entanglement. Part 6. Miasms revisited: non-linear quantum theory as a model for the homeopathic process. Homeopathy. 2004 Jul;93(3):154-8. Review.

Naturopathy:

11221.  Parkman CA. Issues in credentialing CAM providers. Case Manager. 2004 Jul-Aug;15(4):24-7. Review.

Siddha:

11222.  Ranga RS, Girija R, Nur-e-Alam M, Sathishkumar S, Akbarsha MA, Thirugnanam S, Rohr J, Ahmed MM, Chendil D. Rasagenthi lehyam (RL) a novel complementary and alternative medicine for prostate cancer. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol. 2004 Jul;54(1):7-15.

Traditional Medicine:

11223.  Arora RP, Nayak RI, Malhotra V, Mohanty NK, Kulkarni KS. Role of herbal drugs in the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia: clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Himplasia. Probe. 2004 Apr Jun; XLII: 23-26.   

11224.  Farrant P, Higgins E. A granulomatous response to tribal medicine as a feature of the immune reconstitution syndrome. Clin Exp Dermatol. 2004 Jul;29(4):366-8.

Yoga & Meditation:

11225.  Ott MJ. Mindfulness meditation: a path of transformation & healing. J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 2004 Jul;42(7):22-9. Review.

Alternative / Complementary Medicine:

11226.  Adams J. Exploring the interface between complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and rural general practice: a call for research. Health Place. 2004 Sep;10(3):285-7.

11227.  Balon JW, Mior SA. Chiropractic care in asthma and allergy. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2004 Aug;93(2 Suppl 1):S55-60. Review.

11228.  Beddoe AE, Murphy SO. Does mindfulness decrease stress and foster empathy among nursing students? J Nurs Educ. 2004 Jul;43(7):305-12.

11229.  Beliveau R, Gingras D. Green tea: prevention and treatment of cancer by nutraceuticals. Lancet. 2004 Sep 18;364(9439):1021-2.

11230.  Berk DR, Kanzler MH. Prevalence of alternative medicine use for skin conditions in a primary care population. Arch Dermatol. 2004 Jul;140(7):892.

11231.  Blazso G, Gabor M, Schonlau F, Rohdewald P. Pycnogenol accelerates wound healing and reduces scar formation. Phytother Res. 2004 Jul;18(7):579-81.

11232.  Boon H, Verhoef M, O'Hara D, Findlay B. From parallel practice to integrative health care: a conceptual framework. BMC Health Serv Res. 2004 Jul 01;4(1):15.

11233.  Caplan A. An interview with Arthur Caplan. Interview by Vicki Glaser. Rejuvenation Res. 2004 Summer;7(2):148-53.

11234.  Chatwin J, Tovey P. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), cancer and group-based action: a critical review of the literature. Eur J Cancer Care (Engl). 2004 Jul;13(3):210-8. Review.

11235.  Chikamori F, Kuniyoshi N, Shibuya S, Takase Y. Perioperative music therapy with a key-lighting keyboard system in elderly patients undergoing digestive tract surgery. Hepatogastroenterology. 2004 Sep-Oct;51(59):1384-6.

11236.  Clements-Cortes A. The use of music in facilitating emotional expression in the terminally ill. Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2004 Jul-Aug;21(4):255-60.

11237.  de Magalhaes JP, Toussaint O. Telomeres and telomerase: a modern fountain of youth? Rejuvenation Res. 2004 Summer;7(2):126-33. Review.

11238.  Eliopoullos C. Integrative care--immune boosting for residents with cancer. Director. 2004 Summer;12(3):182-3.

11239.  Enright S, Chatham K, Ionescu AA, Unnithan VB, Shale DJ. Inspiratory muscle training improves lung function and exercise capacity in adults with cystic fibrosis. Chest. 2004 Aug;126(2):405-11.

11240.  Epstein GN, Halper JP, Barrett EA, Birdsall C, McGee M, Baron KP, Lowenstein S. A pilot study of mind-body changes in adults with asthma who practice mental imagery. Altern Ther Health Med. 2004 Jul-Aug;10(4):66-71.

11241.  Feldman DE, Duffy C, De Civita M, Malleson P, Philibert L, Gibbon M, Ortiz-Alvarez O, Dobkin PL. Factors associated with the use of complementary and alternative medicine in juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Arthritis Rheum. 2004 Aug 15;51(4):527-32.

11242.  Graves N, Krepcho M, Mayo HG. Does yoga speed healing for patients with low back pain? J Fam Pract. 2004 Aug;53(8):661-2.

11243.  Greco CM, Rudy TE, Manzi S. Effects of a stress-reduction program on psychological function, pain, and physical function of systemic lupus erythematosus patients: a randomized controlled trial. Arthritis Rheum. 2004 Aug 15;51(4):625-34.

11244.  Gross CR, Kreitzer MJ, Russas V, Treesak C, Frazier PA, Hertz MI. Mindfulness meditation to reduce symptoms after organ transplant: a pilot study. Adv Mind Body Med. 2004 Summer;20(2):20-9.

11245.  Haramati A, Lumpkin MD. Complementary and alternative medicine: opportunities for education and research. Exp Biol Med (Maywood). 2004 Sep;229(8):695-7. Review.

11246.  Hunt V, Randle J, Freshwater D. Paediatric nurses' attitudes to massage and aromatherapy massage. Complement Ther Nurs Midwifery. 2004 Aug;10(3):194-201.

11247.  Hyman M. Mark Hyman, MD practicing medicine for the future. Altern Ther Health Med. 2004 Jul-Aug;10(4):82-9.

11248.  Kepner J. Yoga research and Richard Freeman. Altern Ther Health Med. 2004 Jul-Aug;10(4):14.

11249.  Lanier WL. Near-death experiences delivered to your home by your friends on the Internet. Mayo Clin Proc. 2004 Aug;79(8):979-82. Review.

11250.  Latham SR. Ethics in the marketing of medical services. Mt Sinai J Med. 2004 Sep;71(4):243-50. Review.

11251.  Lee MS, Lee MS, Kim HJ, Choi ES. Effects of qigong on blood pressure, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and other lipid levels in essential hypertension patients. Int J Neurosci. 2004 Jul;114(7):777-86.

11252.  Lehrer PM, Vaschillo E, Vaschillo B, Lu SE, Scardella A, Siddique M, Habib RH. Biofeedback treatment for asthma. Chest. 2004 Aug;126(2):352-61.

11253.  Li XM, Zhang TF, Sampson H, Zou ZM, Beyer K, Wen MC, Schofield B. The potential use of Chinese herbal medicines in treating allergic asthma. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2004 Aug;93(2 Suppl 1):S35-44. Review.

11254.  Ma HI, Trombly CA, Tickle-Degnen L, Wagenaar RC. Effect of one single auditory cue on movement kinematics in patients with Parkinson's disease. Am J Phys Med Rehabil. 2004 Jul;83(7):530-6.

11255.  Maier R, Greter SE, Maier N. Effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields on cognitive processes - a pilot study on pulsed field interference with cognitive regeneration. Acta Neurol Scand. 2004 Jul;110(1):46-52.

11256.  Manahan B. A brief evidence-based review of two gastrointestinal illnesses: irritable bowel and leaky gut syndrome. Altern Ther Health Med. 2004 Jul-Aug;10(4):14.

11257.  Miles P. Palliative care service at the NIH includes Reiki and other mind-body modalities. Adv Mind Body Med. 2004 Summer;20(2):30-1.

11258.  Myers SP, Cheras PA. The other side of the coin: safety of complementary and alternative medicine. Med J Aust. 2004 Aug 16;181(4):222-5.

11259.  Oh WK, Kantoff PW, Weinberg V, Jones G, Rini BI, Derynck MK, Bok R, Smith MR, Bubley GJ, Rosen RT, DiPaola RS, Small EJ. Prospective, multicenter, randomized phase II trial of the herbal supplement, PC-SPES, and diethylstilbestrol in patients with androgen-independent prostate cancer. J Clin Oncol. 2004 Sep 15;22(18):3705-12.

11260.  Ott MJ. Mindfulness meditation: a path of transformation & healing. J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 2004 Jul;42(7):22-9. Review.

11261.  Parkman CA. Issues in credentialing CAM providers. Case Manager. 2004 Jul-Aug;15(4):24-7. Review.

11262.  Paterson C. 'Take small steps to go a long way' consumer involvement in research into complementary and alternative therapies. Complement Ther Nurs Midwifery. 2004 Aug;10(3):150-61.

11263.  Rein E, Kharazmi A, Winther K. A herbal remedy, Hyben Vital (stand. powder of a subspecies of Rosa canina fruits), reduces pain and improves general wellbeing in patients with osteoarthritis--a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised trial. Phytomedicine. 2004 Jul;11(5):383-91.

11264.  Saucier DM, Tessem FK, Sheerin AH, Elias L. Unilateral forced nostril breathing affects dichotic listening for emotional tones. Brain Cogn. 2004 Jul;55(2):403-5.

11265.  Simonsen HT, Adsersen A, Bremner P, Heinrich M, Wagner Smitt U, Jaroszewski JW. Antifungal constituents of Melicope borbonica. Phytother Res. 2004 Jul;18(7):542-5.

11266.  Su CK, Mehta V, Ravikumar L, Shah R, Pinto H, Halpern J, Koong A, Goffinet D, Le QT. Phase II double-blind randomized study comparing oral aloe vera versus placebo to prevent radiation-related mucositis in patients with head-and-neck neoplasms. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2004 Sep 1;60(1):171-7.

11267.  Theoharides TC, Bielory L. Mast cells and mast cell mediators as targets of dietary supplements. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2004 Aug;93(2 Suppl 1):S24-34. Review.

11268.  Tiran D, Chummun H. Complementary therapies to reduce physiological stress in pregnancy. Complement Ther Nurs Midwifery. 2004 Aug;10(3):162-7. Review.

11269.  Udeinya IJ, Mbah AU, Chijioke CP, Shu EN. An antimalarial extract from neem leaves is antiretroviral. Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg. 2004 Jul;98(7):435-7.

11270.  Ventegodt S, Morad M, Press J, Merrick J, Shek DT. Clinical holistic medicine: holistic adolescent medicine. ScientificWorldJournal. 2004 Aug 04;4:551-61. Review.

11271.  Ventegodt S, Morad M, Vardi G, Merrick J. Clinical holistic medicine: holistic treatment of children. ScientificWorldJournal. 2004 Aug 04;4:581-8. Review.

11272.  Werbach MR. Nutritional therapy: an important component of integrative medicine. Altern Ther Health Med. 2004 Jul-Aug;10(4):12-3, 96.

11273.  Whipple J. Music in intervention for children and adolescents with autism: a meta-analysis. J Music Ther. 2004 Summer;41(2):90-106.

11274.  Whitaker RC.  Mental health and obesity in pediatric primary care: a gap between importance and action. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2004 Aug;158(8):826-8. Review.

11275.  White-Traut R. Providing a nurturing environment for infants in adverse situations: multisensory strategies for newborn care. J Midwifery Womens Health. 2004 Jul-Aug;49(4 Suppl 1):36-41. Review.

11276.  Wright RJ. Alternative modalities for asthma that reduce stress and modify mood states: evidence for underlying psychobiologic mechanisms. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2004 Aug;93(2 Suppl 1):S18-23. Review.

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April, 2005

Some Selected Abstract::

1.  

Jorm AF, Christensen H, Griffiths KM, Parslow RA, Rodgers B, Blewitt KA. Effectiveness of complementary and self-help treatments for anxiety disorders. Med J Aust. 2004 Oct 4;181(7 Suppl):S29-46.

Centre for Mental Health Research, Australian National University, Building 63, Eggleston Road, Acton, ACT 0200, Australia. anthony.jorm@anu.edu.au.

OBJECTIVES: To review the evidence for the effectiveness of complementary and self-help treatments for anxiety disorders. DATA SOURCES: Systematic literature search using PubMed, PsycLit, and the Cochrane Library. DATA SYNTHESIS: 108 treatments were identified and grouped under the categories of medicines and homoeopathic remedies, physical treatments, lifestyle, and dietary changes. We give a description of the 34 treatments (for which evidence was found in the literature searched), the rationale behind the treatments, a review of studies on effectiveness, and the level of evidence for the effectiveness studies. CONCLUSIONS: The treatments with the best evidence of effectiveness are kava (for generalised anxiety), exercise (for generalised anxiety), relaxation training (for generalised anxiety, panic disorder, dental phobia and test anxiety) and bibliotherapy (for specific phobias). There is more limited evidence to support the effectiveness of acupuncture, music, autogenic training and meditation for generalised anxiety; for inositol in the treatment of panic disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder; and for alcohol avoidance by people with alcohol-use disorders to reduce a range of anxiety disorders.

2.  

Moseley GL, Nicholas MK, Hodges PW. Does anticipation of back pain predispose to back trouble?  Brain. 2004 Oct;127(Pt 10):2339-47.

Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute, Randwick, Sydney, Austalia. l.moseley@fhs.usyd.edu.au
Limb movement imparts a perturbation to the body. The impact of that perturbation is limited via anticipatory postural adjustments. The strategy by which the CNS controls anticipatory postural adjustments of the trunk muscles during limb movement is altered during acute back pain and in people with recurrent back pain, even when they are pain free. The altered postural strategy probably serves to protect the spine in the short term, but it is associated with a cost and is thought to predispose spinal structures to injury in the long term. It is not known why this protective strategy might occur even when people are pain free, but one possibility is that it is caused by the anticipation of back pain. In eight healthy subjects, recordings of intramuscular EMG were made from the trunk muscles during single and repetitive arm movements. Anticipation of experimental back pain and anticipation of experimental elbow pain were elicited by the threat of painful cutaneous stimulation. There was no effect of anticipated experimental elbow pain on postural adjustments. During anticipated experimental back pain, for single arm movements there was delayed activation of the deep trunk muscles and augmentation of at least one superficial trunk muscle. For repetitive arm movements, there was decreased activity and a shift from biphasic to monophasic activation of the deep trunk muscles and increased activity of superficial trunk muscles during anticipation of back pain. In both instances, the changes were consistent with adoption of an altered strategy for postural control and were similar to those observed in patients with recurrent back pain. We conclude that anticipation of experimental back pain evokes a protective postural strategy that stiffens the spine. This protective strategy is associated with compressive cost and is thought to predispose to spinal injury if maintained long term.

3.  

Nayak NN, Shankar K. Yoga: a therapeutic approach. Phys Med Rehabil Clin N Am. 2004 Nov;15(4):783-98, vi. Review.

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (117), Veterans Affairs Northern California Health Care System, 150 Muir Road, Martinez, CA 94553, USA. Niminayak@yahoo.com

Yoga, practiced widely in the East, is now popular in the West as part of a healthy lifestyle. This article brings a medical perspective to the practice of yoga. Selected yoga postures that are believed to benefit certain medical conditions are highlighted. In addition, the philosophy, general guidelines, and medical benefits of yoga practice are described.

4.  

Ottawa Panel. Ottawa Panel evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for therapeutic exercises in the management of rheumatoid arthritis in adults.
Phys Ther. 2004 Oct;84(10):934-72. Review.

Ottawa Panel.

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The purpose of this project was to create guidelines for the use of therapeutic exercises and manual therapy in the management of adult patients (>18 years of age) with a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis according to the 1987 American Rheumatism Association criteria. METHODS: Evidence from comparative controlled trials was identified and synthesized using The Cochrane Collaboration methods. An expert panel was formed by inviting professional stakeholder organizations to each nominate a representative. This panel developed a set of criteria for grading the strength of both the evidence and the recommendation. RESULTS: Six positive recommendations of clinical benefit were developed on therapeutic exercises. The efficacy of manual therapy interventions could not be determined for lack of evidence. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: The panel recommends the use of therapeutic exercises for rheumatoid arthritis. Further research is needed to determine the efficacy of manual therapy in the management of this disease.

5.  

Schmid W, Aldridge D. Active music therapy in the treatment of multiple sclerosis patients: a matched control study. J Music Ther. 2004 Fall;41(3):225-40.

Twenty multiple sclerosis patients (14 female, 6 male) were involved in the study, their ages ranging rom 29 to 47 years. Ten participants formed the therapy group, and 10 the control group. The groups were comparable on the standard neurological classification scheme Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). Exclusion criteria were pregnancy and mental disorders requiring medication. Measurements were taken before therapy began (T1), and subsequently every 3 months (T2-T4). This battery included indicators of clinical depression and anxiety (Beck Depression Inventory and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), a self-acceptance scale (SESA) and a life quality assessment (Hamburg Quality of Life Questionnaire in Multiple Sclerosis). In addition, data were collected on cognitive (MSFC) and functional (EDSS) parameters. Patients in the therapy group received 3 blocks of music therapy in single sessions over the course of the one year project (8 to 10 sessions respectively). The music therapy approach used for this study is based on the Nordoff Robbins approach (Nordoff & Robbins, 1977). There was no significant difference between the music therapy treatment group and the control group. However, the effect size statistics comparing both groups show a medium effect size on the scales measuring self esteem (d = 0.5423, r =.026), depression HAD-D (d = 0.63, r = 0.310) and anxiety HAD-A (d = 0.63, r = 0.310). Significant improvements were found for the therapy group over time (T1-T4) in the scale values of self esteem, depression, and anxiety. Given the stigmatizing effect of a chronic degenerative disease, the positive benefits of music therapy point to a realm of aesthetic considerations in assessing clinical improvement.

6.  

UK BEAM Trial Team. United Kingdom back pain exercise and manipulation (UK BEAM) randomised trial: cost effectiveness of physical treatments for back pain in primary care.
BMJ. 2004 Dec 11;329(7479):1381.

OBJECTIVE: To assess the cost effectiveness of adding spinal manipulation, exercise classes, or manipulation followed by exercise ("combined treatment") to "best care" in general practice for patients consulting with low back pain. DESIGN: Stochastic cost utility analysis alongside pragmatic randomised trial with factorial design. SETTING: 181 general practices and 63 community settings for physical treatments around 14 centres across the United Kingdom. PARTICIPANTS: 1287 (96%) of 1334 trial participants. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Healthcare costs, quality adjusted life years (QALYs), and cost per QALY over 12 months. RESULTS: Over one year, mean treatment costs relative to "best care" were 195 pounds sterling (360 dollars; 279 euros; 95% credibility interval 85 pounds sterling to 308 pounds sterling) for manipulation, 140 pounds sterling (3 pounds sterling to 278 pounds sterling) for exercise, and 125 pounds sterling (21 pounds sterling to 228 pounds sterling) for combined treatment. All three active treatments increased participants' average QALYs compared with best care alone. Each extra QALY that combined treatment yielded relative to best care cost 3800 pounds sterling; in economic terms it had an "incremental cost effectiveness ratio" of 3800 pounds sterling. Manipulation alone had a ratio of 8700 pounds sterling relative to combined treatment. If the NHS was prepared to pay at least 10,000 pounds sterling for each extra QALY (lower than previous recommendations in the United Kingdom), manipulation alone would probably be the best strategy. If manipulation was not available, exercise would have an incremental cost effectiveness ratio of 8300 pounds sterling relative to best care. CONCLUSIONS: Spinal manipulation is a cost effective addition to "best care" for back pain in general practice. Manipulation alone probably gives better value for money than manipulation followed by exercise.

7.  

West J, Otte C, Geher K, Johnson J, Mohr DC. Effects of Hatha yoga and African dance on perceived stress, affect, and salivary cortisol. Ann Behav Med. 2004 Oct;28(2):114-8.

Reed College, USA. jeremy.west@stanford.edu

BACKGROUND: Dance and yoga have been shown to produce improvements in psychological well-being. PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to examine some of the psychological and neuroendocrine response to these activities. METHODS: Sixty-nine healthy college students participated in one of three 90-min classes: African dance (n = 21), Hatha yoga (n= 18), or a biology lecture as a control session (n = 30). Before and after each condition participants completed the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), completed the Positive Affect and Negative Affect Schedule, and provided a saliva sample for cortisol. RESULTS: There were significant reductions in PSS and negative affect (ps < .0001) and Time x Treatment interactions (ps < .0001) such that African dance and Hatha yoga showed significant declines, whereas there was no significant change in biology lecture. There was no significant main effect for positive affect (p = .53), however there was a significant interaction effect (p < .001) such that positive affect increased in African dance, decreased in biology lecture, and did not change significantly in Hatha yoga. There was a significant main effect for salivary cortisol (p < .05) and a significant interaction effect (p < .0001) such that cortisol increased in African dance, decreased in Hatha yoga, and did not change in biology. Changes in cortisol were not significantly related to changes in psychological variables across treatments. There was 1 significant interaction effect (p = .04) such that change in positive affect and change in cortisol were negatively correlated in Hatha yoga but positively correlated in Africa dance and biology. CONCLUSIONS: Both African dance and Hatha yoga reduced perceived stress and negative affect. Cortisol increased in African dance and decreased in Hatha yoga. Therefore, even when these interventions produce similar positive psychological effects, the effects may be very different on physiological stress processes. One factor that may have particular salience is that amount of physiological arousal produced by the intervention.

11782.  Adams M, Kunert O, Haslinger E, Bauer R. Inhibition of leukotriene biosynthesis by quinolone alkaloids from the fruits of Evodia rutaecarpa. Planta Med. 2004 Oct;70(10):904-8.

11783.  Ades PA, Wu G. Benefits of tai chi in chronic heart failure: body or mind? Am J Med. 2004 Oct 15;117(8):611-2.

11784. Agarwal A, Vasanthi H R, Attrey D P, Dubey G P. Therapeutic efficacy of an ayurvedic formuation in neuropsychiatric disorders of the elderly. Indian J Clin Pract 2004, 15(4), 40-51, 54.

11785.  Barr P. A little innovation. Baylor launches biotech firm to sell cancer therapy. Mod Healthc. 2004 Nov 15;34(46):20.

11786.  Behall KM, Scholfield DJ, Hallfrisch J. Diets containing barley significantly reduce lipids in mildly hypercholesterolemic men and women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Nov;80(5):1185-93.

11787.  Bent S, Padula A, Neuhaus J. Safety and efficacy of citrus aurantium for weight loss. Am J Cardiol. 2004 Nov 15;94(10):1359-61. Review.

11788.  Bhat P R. Evaluation of Ayurvedic therapies in the management of benign prostatic hyperthraphy. Dr M Sahu, Shalya Shalakya Dep, Banaras Hindu University. Varanasi. 2004.

11789.  Bhomaj R A. The concept of sleep in Ayurveda, in stress management. J Natn Integrat Med Ass 2004, 46(6), 10-12.

11790.  Bishop JP, Stenger VJ. Retroactive prayer: lots of history, not much mystery, and no science. BMJ. 2004 Dec 18;329(7480):1444-6. Review.

11791.   Bosnyak DJ, Eaton RA, Roberts LE. Distributed auditory cortical representations are modified when non-musicians are trained at pitch discrimination with 40 Hz amplitude modulated tones. Cereb Cortex. 2004 Oct;14(10):1088-99.

11792.   Bremner P, Tang S, Birkmayer H, Fiebich BL, Munoz E, Marquez N, Rivera D, Heinrich M. Phenylpropanoid NF-kappaB inhibitors from Bupleurum fruticosum. Planta Med. 2004 Oct;70(10):914-8.

11793.   Burnett KM, Solterbeck LA, Strapp CM. Scent and mood state following an anxiety-provoking task. Psychol Rep. 2004 Oct;95(2):707-22.

11794.   Chen H, Lamer TJ, Rho RH, Marshall KA, Sitzman BT, Ghazi SM, Brewer RP. Contemporary management of neuropathic pain for the primary care physician. Mayo Clin Proc. 2004 Dec;79(12):1533-45. Review. 

11795.   Chotkowski LA. More "on chriopractic". Conn Med. 2004 Oct;68(9):603.

11796.   Chu DA. Tai Chi, Qi Gong and Reiki. Phys Med Rehabil Clin N Am. 2004 Nov;15(4):773-81, vi. Review.

11797.   Coffey CS, Steiner D, Baker BA, Allison DB. A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial of a product containing ephedrine, caffeine, and other ingredients from herbal sources for treatment of overweight and obesity in the absence of lifestyle treatment. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2004 Nov;28(11):1411-9.

11798.   Connor LH. Relief, risk and renewal: mixed therapy regimens in an Australian suburb. Soc Sci Med. 2004 Oct;59(8):1695-705.

11799.   Cyna AM, McAuliffe GL, Andrew MI. Hypnosis for pain relief in labour and childbirth: a systematic review. Br J Anaesth. 2004 Oct;93(4):505-11. Epub 2004 Jul 26. Review.

11800.   D'Amico D. Treatment strategies in migraine patients. Neurol Sci. 2004 Oct;25 Suppl 3:S242-3.

11801.   Das PC. Learning from low income countries: what are the lessons? Health is a dynamic process. BMJ. 2004 Nov 13;329(7475):1185-6.

11802.   Das SK, Mohanty RK, Nanda DK, Misra S. A clinical trial of epidural steroid injection (Depo-Medrol) in the treatment of chronic low back pain. Journal of Anaesthesiology. 2004 Apr; 20(2): 157-160.

11803.   Diaper A, Hindmarch I. A double-blind, placebo-controlled investigation of the effects of two doses of a valerian preparation on the sleep, cognitive and psychomotor function of sleep-disturbed older adults. Phytother Res. 2004 Oct;18(10):831-6.

11804.   Durie M. Understanding health and illness: research at the interface between science and indigenous knowledge. Int J Epidemiol. 2004 Oct;33(5):1138-43. Epub 2004 Jun 24. Review.

11805.   Ende C, Gebhardt R. Inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 activities by selected flavonoids. Planta Med. 2004 Oct;70(10):1006-8.

11806.  Epstein G. "Never the twain shall meet": spirituality or psychotherapy? Adv Mind Body Med. 2004 Fall;20(3):12-9. Review.

11807.   Epstein G. Mental imagery: the language of spirit. Adv Mind Body Med. 2004 Fall;20(3):4-10. Review.

11808.   Ernst E. Research capacity in complementary medicine. J R Soc Med. 2004 Oct;97(10):504-5.

11809.  Feng X, Gao Z, Li S, Jones SH, Hecht SM. DNA polymerase beta lyase inhibitors from Maytenus putterlickoides. J Nat Prod. 2004 Oct;67(10):1744-7.

11810.   Fraunfelder FW. Ocular side effects from herbal medicines and nutritional supplements. Am J Ophthalmol. 2004 Oct;138(4):639-47.

11811.   Gallagher RM. Biopsychosocial pain medicine and mind-brain-body science. Phys Med Rehabil Clin N Am. 2004 Nov;15(4):855-82, vii. Review.

11812.   Garami M, Schuler D, Babosa M, Borgulya G, Hauser P, Muller J, Paksy A, Szabo E, Hidvegi M, Fekete G. Fermented wheat germ extract reduces chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia in pediatric cancer patients. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2004 Oct;26(10):631-5.

11813.  Goldrosen MH, Straus SE. Complementary and alternative medicine: assessing the evidence for immunological benefits. Nat Rev Immunol. 2004 Nov;4(11):912-21. Review.

11814.  Govindan S, Viswanathan S, Vijayasekaran V, Alagappan R. Further studies on the clinical efficacy of Solanum xanthocarpum and Solanum trilobatum in bronchial asthma. Phytother Res. 2004 Oct;18(10):805-9.

11815.  Hama Y, Kaji T. A migrated acupuncture needle in the medulla oblongata. Arch Neurol. 2004 Oct;61(10):1608.

11816.  Haughney A. Nausea & vomiting in end-stage cancer. Am J Nurs. 2004 Nov;104(11):40-8; quiz 49. Review.

11817.  Heath H. Positive view beats off negative effects. Nurs Older People. 2004 Oct;16(7):3.

11818.  Heinonen H, Aro AR, Aalto AM, Uutela A. Is the evaluation of the global quality of life determined by emotional status? Qual Life Res. 2004 Oct;13(8):1347-56.

11819.  Hill RB. The healing Buddha. J Med Biogr. 2004 Nov;12(4):188.

11820.  Hu PC, Su Y. Effects of flotation therapy on relaxation and mental state. Chin Med J (Engl). 2004 Oct;117(10):1579-81.

11821.  Irani F S. Comparison of bacopa/herpestris monnieri and centella/hydrocotyle asiatica both called brahmi in ayurveda. J natn Integrat med Ass 2004, 46(9), 9-13.

11822.  Jang DS, Cuendet M, Su BN, Totura S, Riswan S, Fong HH, Pezzuto JM, Kinghorn AD. Constituents of the seeds of Hernandia ovigera with inhibitory activity against cyclooxygenase-2. Planta Med. 2004 Oct;70(10):893-6.

11823.  Jeong HJ, Chung HS, Kim YH, Moon BS, Sung KK, Bai SJ, Cho KH, Kim YK, Hong SH, Shin T, Kim HM. Differential regulation by Seogak Jihwang-Tang on cytokines production in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from the cerebral infarction patients presenting with altered consciousness. J Ethnopharmacol. 2004 Oct;94(2-3):289-94.

11824.  Jorm AF, Christensen H, Griffiths KM, Parslow RA, Rodgers B, Blewitt KA. Effectiveness of complementary and self-help treatments for anxiety disorders. Med J Aust. 2004 Oct 4;181(7 Suppl):S29-46. Review.

11825.  Joshi k, Chavan P, Warude D, Patwardhan B. Molecular markers in herbal drug technology. Curr Sci 2004, 87(2), 159-63.

11826.  Kala C P. Indigenous uses of plants as health tonic in uttaranchal Himalaya, India. Ann For 2003, 11(2), 249-54.

11827.  Kalman DS. An acute clinical trial evaluating the cardiovascular effects of an herbal ephedra-caffeine weight loss product in healthy overweight adults. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2004 Oct;28(10):1355-6.

11828.  Kasprisin A. Alternative cognitive therapy for emotional instability (pathologic laughing and crying). Phys Med Rehabil Clin N Am. 2004 Nov;15(4):883-917, vii-viii. Review.

11829.  Kaur K, Rani G, Widodo N, Nagpal A, Taira K, Kaul SC, Wadhwa R. Evaluation of the anti-proliferative and anti-oxidative activities of leaf extract from in vivo and in vitro raised Ashwagandha. Food Chem Toxicol. 2004 Dec;42(12):2015-20.

11830.  Kemper KJ, O'Connor KG. Pediatricians' recommendations for complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapies. Ambul Pediatr. 2004 Nov-Dec;4(6):482-7.

11831.  Kessel B, Kronenberg F. The role of complementary and alternative medicine in management of menopausal symptoms. Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am. 2004 Dec;33(4):717-39. Review.

11832.  Kiss A, Kowalski J, Melzig MF. Compounds from Epilobium angustifolium inhibit the specific metallopeptidases ACE, NEP and APN. Planta Med. 2004 Oct;70(10):919-23.

11833.  Knight J. Religion and science: Buddhism on the brain. Nature. 2004 Dec 9;432(7018):670.

11834.  Krebs EE, Ensrud KE, MacDonald R, Wilt TJ. Phytoestrogens for treatment of menopausal symptoms: a systematic review. Obstet Gynecol. 2004 Oct;104(4):824-36. Review.

11835.  Lee CO. Clinical trials in cancer. Part I. Biomedical, complementary, and alternative medicine: finding active trials and results of closed trials. Clin J Oncol Nurs. 2004 Oct;8(5):531-5. Review.

11836.  Lee MS, Ryu H. Qi-training enhances neutrophil function by increasing growth hormone levels in elderly men. Int J Neurosci. 2004 Oct;114(10):1313-22.

11837.  Lenaerts ME. Alternative therapies for tension-type headache. Curr Pain Headache Rep. 2004 Dec;8(6):484-8. Review.

11838.  Leong RW, Lawrance IC, Ching JY, Cheung CM, Fung SS, Ho JN, Philpott J, Wallace AR, Sung JJ. Knowledge, quality of life, and use of complementary and alternative medicine and therapies in inflammatory bowel disease: a comparison of Chinese and Caucasian patients. Dig Dis Sci. 2004 Oct;49(10):1672-6.

11839.  Lew HL, Lee J, Chen JL, Chen SC. Complementary and alternative medicine education in the United States, China, and Taiwan. Phys Med Rehabil Clin N Am. 2004 Nov;15(4):933-42, viii-ix.

11840.  Lundgren J, Ugalde V. The demographics and economics of complementary alternative medicine. Phys Med Rehabil Clin N Am. 2004 Nov;15(4):955-61, ix. Review.

11841.  Lutz A, Greischar LL, Rawlings NB, Ricard M, Davidson RJ. Long-term meditators self-induce high-amplitude gamma synchrony during mental practice. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2004 Nov 16;101(46):16369-73.

11842.  Lynch DM. Cranberry for prevention of urinary tract infections. Am Fam Physician. 2004 Dec 1;70(11):2175-7. Review.

11843.  Maas M. Long-term care for older adults: advocating for a new health-care paradigm. J Gerontol Nurs. 2004 Oct;30(10):3-4.

11844.  Macpherson H, Scullion A, Thomas KJ, Walters S. Patient reports of adverse events associated with acupuncture treatment: a prospective national survey. Qual Saf Health Care. 2004 Oct;13(5):349-55.

11845.  Manchanda S, Nigam US. Therapeutic evaluation of nasyakarma [Medicine given through nostrils] in facial paralysis [ardita]. Antiseptic. 2004 Jun; 101(6): 218-220.

11846.  Marci CD, Moran EK, Orr SP. Physiologic evidence for the interpersonal role of laughter during psychotherapy. J Nerv Ment Dis. 2004 Oct;192(10):689-95.

11847.  Matalon S, Wright JR. Surfactant proteins and inflammation: the yin and the yang. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 2004 Dec;31(6):585-6.

11848.  Modlin T. Psychoneuroimmunology--mind-brain-immune interactions. S Afr Med J. 2004 Oct;94(10):797-8; author reply 798.

11849.  Mollinger H, Schneider R, Loffel M, Walach H. A double-blind, randomized, homeopathic pathogenetic trial with healthy persons: comparing two high potencies. Forsch Komplementarmed Klass Naturheilkd. 2004 Oct;11(5):274-80.

11850.  Moseley GL, Nicholas MK, Hodges PW. Does anticipation of back pain predispose to back trouble? Brain. 2004 Oct;127(Pt 10):2339-47.

11851.  Nagaya N, Yamamoto H, Uematsu M, Itoh T, Nakagawa K, Miyazawa T, Kangawa K, Miyatake K. Green tea reverses endothelial dysfunction in healthy smokers. Heart. 2004 Dec;90(12):1485-6.

11852.  Narayanan N, Thirugnanasambantham P, Viswanathan S, Rajarajan S, Sukumar E. Comparative antibacterial activities of clerodendrum serratum and premna herbacea. Indian Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences. 2004 Jul-Aug; 66(4): 453-454.

11853.  Nayak NN, Shankar K. Yoga: a therapeutic approach. Phys Med Rehabil Clin N Am. 2004 Nov;15(4):783-98, vi. Review.

11854.  Notka F, Meier G, Wagner R. Concerted inhibitory activities of Phyllanthus amarus on HIV replication in vitro and ex vivo. Antiviral Res. 2004 Nov;64(2):93-102.

11855.  Nowak-Wegrzyn A, Sampson HA. Food allergy therapy. Immunol Allergy Clin North Am. 2004 Nov;24(4):705-25, viii.

11856.  Ottawa Panel. Ottawa Panel evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for therapeutic exercises in the management of rheumatoid arthritis in adults. Phys Ther. 2004 Oct;84(10):934-72. Review.

11857.  Pelletier CL. The effect of music on decreasing arousal due to stress: a meta-analysis. J Music Ther. 2004 Fall;41(3):192-214.

11858.  Rapoport AM, Bigal ME. Preventive migraine therapy: what is new. Neurol Sci. 2004 Oct;25 Suppl 3:S177-85. Review.

11859.  Sandhu JS, Berri A, Gupta D, Arya M, Singh R, Sandhu P. Essential hypertension- primary prevention. Journal, Indian Academy of Clinical Medicine. 2004 Oct-Dec; 5(4): 306-309.

11860.  Saper RB, Eisenberg DM, Phillips RS. Common dietary supplements for weight loss. Am Fam Physician. 2004 Nov 1;70(9):1731-8. Review.

11861.  Saper RB, Kales SN, Paquin J, Burns MJ, Eisenberg DM, Davis RB, Phillips RS. Heavy metal content of ayurvedic herbal medicine products. JAMA. 2004 Dec 15;292(23):2868-73.

11862.  Schmid W, Aldridge D. Active music therapy in the treatment of multiple sclerosis patients: a matched control study. J Music Ther. 2004 Fall;41(3):225-40.

11863.  Shankar K, Liao LP. Traditional systems of medicine. Phys Med Rehabil Clin N Am. 2004 Nov;15(4):725-47, v. Review.

11864.  Sharma VK, Choi J, Sharma N, Choi M, Seo SY. In vitro anti-tyrosinase activity of 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-furfural isolated from Dictyophora indusiata. Phytother Res. 2004 Oct;18(10):841-4.

11865.  Shaver A. Much more than a headache: migraine treatment requires broader spectrum of therapies. Adv Nurse Pract. 2004 Oct;12(10):26-33; quiz 33-4. Review.

11866.  Shermer M. Flying carpets and scientific prayers. Scientific experiments claiming that distant intercessory prayer produces salubrious effects are deeply flawed. Sci Am. 2004 Nov;291(5):34.

11867.  Sherry E, Reynolds M, Sivananthan S, Mainawalala S, Warnke PH. Inhalational phytochemicals as possible treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis: two case reports. Am J Infect Control. 2004 Oct;32(6):369-70.

11868.  Smith JC, Joyce CA. Mozart versus new age music: relaxation states, stress, and ABC relaxation theory. J Music Ther. 2004 Fall;41(3):215-24.

11869.  Srivastava S, Johri J K, Ahmad M R, Pushpangadan P.  Strategies for development of the herbal drugs in the third world countries a report. J scient ind Res 2004, 63 (7), 618-22.

11870.  Tilak JC, Banerjee M, Mohan H, Devasagayam TP. Antioxidant availability of turmeric in relation to its medicinal and culinary uses. Phytother Res. 2004 Oct;18(10):798-804.

11871.  Turner B, Molgaard C, Marckmann P. Effect of garlic (Allium sativum) powder tablets on serum lipids, blood pressure and arterial stiffness in normo-lipidaemic volunteers: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Br J Nutr. 2004 Oct;92(4):701-6.

11872.  UK BEAM Trial Team. United Kingdom back pain exercise and manipulation (UK BEAM) randomised trial: effectiveness of physical treatments for back pain in primary care. BMJ. 2004 Dec 11;329(7479):1377.

11873.  UK BEAM Trial Team. United Kingdom back pain exercise and manipulation (UK BEAM) randomised trial: cost effectiveness of physical treatments for back pain in primary care. BMJ. 2004 Dec 11;329(7479):1381.

11874.  Vas J, Mendez C, Perea-Milla E, Vega E, Panadero MD, Leon JM, Borge MA, Gaspar O, Sanchez-Rodriguez F, Aguilar I, Jurado R. Acupuncture as a complementary therapy to the pharmacological treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee: randomised controlled trial. BMJ. 2004 Nov 20;329(7476):1216.

11875.  Villano LM, White AR. Alternative therapies for tobacco dependence. Med Clin North Am. 2004 Nov;88(6):1607-21. Review.

11876.  West J, Otte C, Geher K, Johnson J, Mohr DC. Effects of Hatha yoga and African dance on perceived stress, affect, and salivary cortisol. Ann Behav Med. 2004 Oct;28(2):114-8.

11877.  Wilkins MK, Moore ML. Music intervention in the intensive care unit: a complementary therapy to improve patient outcomes. Evid Based Nurs. 2004 Oct;7(4):103-4.

11878.  Willcox ML, Bodeker G. Traditional herbal medicines for malaria. BMJ. 2004 Nov 13;329(7475):1156-9. Review.

11879.  Zhang MM, Liu XM, He L. Effect of integrated traditional Chinese and Western medicine on SARS: a review of clinical evidence. World J Gastroenterol. 2004 Dec 1;10(23):3500-5. Review.

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July, 2005

Some Selected Abstract::

1.  

Adams M, Pacher T, Greger H, Bauer R. Inhibition of leukotriene biosynthesis by stilbenoids from Stemona species. J Nat Prod. 2005 Jan;68(1):83-5.

Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Pharmacognosy, University of Graz, A-8010 Graz, Austria.

Fifteen stilbenoids and two alkaloids from Stemona collinsae, S. tuberosa, and S. peirrei were tested alongside the commercially available stilbenoids resveratrol and pinosylvin for inhibition of leukotriene formation in an ex vivo test system based on activated human neutrophilic granulocytes. The stilbenoids resveratrol (1), pinosylvin (2), dihydropinosylvin (3), stilbostemin A (4), stilbostemin B (5), stilbostemin D (6), stilbostemin F (7), stilbostemin G (8), stemofuran B (9), stemofuran C (10), stemofuran D (11), stemofuran G (12), stemofuran J (13), stemanthrene A (14), stemanthrene B (15), stemanthrene C (16), and stemanthrene D (17) showed structure-dependent activities with IC(50) values ranging from 3.7 to >50 microM. The alkaloids tuberostemonine (18) and neotuberostemonine (19) were inactive at a concentration of 50 microM.

2.  

Bloomberg GR, Chen E. The relationship of psychologic stress with childhood asthma. Immunol Allergy Clin North Am. 2005 Feb;25(1):83-105.

Division of Allergy and Pulmonary Medicine, Washington University Medical School, St. Louis Children's Hospital, One Children's Place, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. bloomberg@kids.wustl.edu

The psychologic influence on childhood asthma has long been a subject of investigation and controversy. This article illustrates the evidence that psychologic stress is related to children with asthma. Individual experience, the impact of family and neighborhood, the effect of caregiver mental status, and the presence of negative psychologic events affect symptoms and management. The pathways through which these factors influence asthma are mediated through cognitive and biologic mechanisms, with evidence indicating changes in behavior and alteration in immune response as underlying mechanisms. Psychologic issues are important in the patient with severe asthma. The mind-body paradigm that links psychologic stress to disease is necessary when considering the global evaluation of childhood asthma.

3.  

Bodin P, Fagevik Olsen M, Bake B, Kreuter M. Effects of abdominal binding on breathing patterns during breathing exercises in persons with tetraplegia. Spinal Cord. 2005 Feb;43(2):117-22.

Department of Physiotherapy, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Goteborg, Sweden.

STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional, experimental. OBJECTIVES: To investigate and compare static lung volumes and breathing patterns in persons with a cervical spinal cord lesion during breathing at rest, ordinary deep breathing, positive expiratory pressure (PEP) and inspiratory resistance-positive expiratory pressure (IR-PEP) with and without an abdominal binder (AB). SETTING: The outpatient clinic at the Spinal Unit at Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Goteborg, Sweden. METHOD: The study group consisted of 20 persons with complete cervical cord lesion at C5-C8 level. Breathing patterns and static lung volumes with and without an AB were measured using a body plethysmograph. RESULTS:: With an AB, static lung volumes decreased, vital capacity increased, breathing patterns changed only marginally and functional residual capacity remained unchanged during PEP and IR-PEP. CONCLUSION: Evidence supporting the general use of an AB to prevent respiratory complications by means of respiratory training is questionable. However, the interindividual variation in our results indicates that we cannot rule out that some patients may benefit from the treatment.

4.  

Bugbee ME, Wellisch DK, Arnott IM, Maxwell JR, Kirsch DL, Sayre JW, Bassett LW. Breast core-needle biopsy: clinical trial of relaxation technique versus medication versus no intervention for anxiety reduction. Radiology. 2005 Jan;234(1):73-8.

Iris Cantor Center for Breast Imaging, Department of Radiology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 200 UCLA Medical Plaza, Room 165-47, Box 956952, Los Angeles, CA 90095-6952, USA.

PURPOSE: To evaluate effectiveness of oral anxiolytic medication versus relaxation technique for anxiety reduction in women undergoing breast core-needle biopsy (CNB). MATERIALS AND METHODS: The institutional review board reviewed and approved the study. Informed consent was obtained from 143 consecutive women scheduled for breast CNB. Women were randomized as follows: no anxiety intervention (usual care group), relaxation therapy with an audiotape of classical music and ocean sounds during CNB (relaxation group), and 0.5-mg of alprazolam administered orally 15 minutes before CNB (medication group). Anxiety before, during, and 24 hours after the procedure was assessed with State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and self-reported visual analog scale from 0 (no anxiety) to 10 (worst anxiety). Data analysis was performed with statistical software. Descriptive statistics were computed for all variables. Group differences were determined with analysis of variance. Differences in mean values were assessed with Bonferroni multiple comparison procedure. Categorical demographic differences were assessed with chi(2) statistic. RESULTS: Preprocedural State-Trait Anxiety Inventory scores indicated that women were not inherently anxious: usual care group, score of 44.63; relaxation group, 45.74; and medication group, 49.1. Scores represented significantly elevated anxiety for women in all three groups when compared with the normative value of 35.12 (P < .0001), with no statistically significant differences between the scores of the three groups. Women in medication group reported significant reductions in anxiety (-44%) from levels determined before the procedure to levels determined during the procedure (P = .02) and significant reduction during the procedure when compared with changes in usual care (+15%) and relaxation (-8%) groups (P = .02). Women in all three groups reported significant reduction in anxiety from levels determined before the procedure to levels determined at 24 hours after it (P < .0001). There was no significant difference (P = .95) in 24-hour postprocedural anxiety levels among the three groups. CONCLUSION: Use of oral anxiolytic medication before breast CNB can significantly reduce anxiety women experience during the procedure. (c) RSNA, 2004.

5.  

Cohen MH, Sandler L, Hrbek A, Davis RB, Eisenberg DM.
Policies pertaining to complementary and alternative medical therapies in a random sample of 39 academic health centers. Altern Ther Health Med. 2005 Jan-Feb;11(1):36-40.

Harvard Medical School Osher Institute, Boston, Mass, USA.

This research documents policies in 39 randomly selected academic medical centers integrating complementary and alternative medical (CAM) services into conventional care. Twenty-three offered CAM services-most commonly, acupuncture, massage, dietary supplements, mind-body therapies, and music therapy. None had written policies concerning credentialing practices or malpractice liability. Only 10 reported a written policy governing use of dietary supplements, although three sold supplements in inpatient formularies, one in the psychiatry department, and five in outpatient pharmacies. Thus, few academic medical centers have sufficiently integrated CAM services into conventional care by developing consensus-written policies governing credentialing, malpractice liability, and dietary supplement use.

6.  

Cohen-Katz J, Wiley SD, Capuano T, Baker DM, Kimmel S, Shapiro S.The effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction on nurse stress and burnout, Part II: A quantitative and qualitative study. Holist Nurs Pract. 2005 Jan-Feb;19(1):26-35.

Lehigh Valley Hospital, Department of Family Medicine, 17th & Chew Sts, Allentown, PA 18105, USA. Joanne.Cohen-Katz@lvh.com

This article is the second in a series reporting on research exploring the effects of Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction on nurses and describes the quantitative data. The third article describes qualitative data. Treatment group participants reduced scores on 2 of 3 subscales of the Maslach Burnout Inventory significantly more than wait-list controls; within-group comparisons for both groups pretreatment and posttreatment revealed similar findings. Changes were maintained as long as 3-month posttreatment. Implications of these findings are discussed.

7.  

Grabois M. Management of chronic low back pain. Am J Phys Med Rehabil. 2005 Mar;84(3 Suppl):S29-41.

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA.

Chronic low back pain is common. It presents a clinical challenge with widespread implications for resource utilization on a national scale. The causes of chronic low back pain may be mechanical or nonmechanical, nociceptive or neuropathic. Diagnosis is problematic because available tools lack both specificity and sensitivity. In rare instances, the cause of chronic low back pain can be attributed to an identified cause. Comprehensive pain management relies on the use of pharmacotherapy, physical therapy, and a multidisciplinary approach to treatment. Recent studies have shown a benefit for traditional adjunctive therapies and interdisciplinary treatment. Antidepressants and opioids have been and remain key elements for medical management, and some recently developed therapies have shown promising results in clinical trials. The following article presents an overview of evidence-based management for chronic low back pain, with an emphasis on pharmaceutical therapies.

8.

Honda K, Jacobson JS. Use of complementary and alternative medicine among United States adults: the influences of personality, coping strategies, and social support. Prev Med. 2005 Jan;40(1):46-53.

Department of Epidemiology, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA. kh2086@columbia.edu

BACKGROUND: Although patterns of utilization of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in the community have begun to be described, few studies have addressed the relationships between dispositional psychological factors and the use of CAM. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between CAM use and personality, coping strategies, and perceived social support in a representative sample of adults in the United States. METHODS: Data were drawn from the Midlife Development in the United States Survey (MIDUS), a representative sample of 3,032 adults aged 25-74 in the US population. We analyzed use of acupuncture, biofeedback, chiropractic, energy healing, exercise/movement therapy, herbal medicine, high-dose megavitamins, homeopathy, hypnosis, imagery techniques, massage, prayer/spiritual practice, relaxation/mediation, and special diet within the last year. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the association of personality, dispositional coping strategies (primary and secondary control), and perceived social support and strain with CAM use, controlling for sociodemographic factors, medical care access, and physical and mental disorders. RESULTS: Openness was positively associated with the use of all types of CAM except manipulative body-based methods. Extroversion was inversely correlated with the use of mind-body therapies. Primary control was inversely and secondary control directly correlated with the use of CAM. Perceived friend support was positively associated with the use of mind-body therapies, manipulative body-based methods, and alternative medical systems. Perceived partner strain was positively associated with the use of biologically based therapies, and family strain increased the odds of manipulative body-based methods. CONCLUSIONS: This study is the first to document a significant association between specific domains of personality, coping strategies, and social support, and the use of CAM among adults in the general population. Understanding the relationships between psychological factors and CAM use may help researchers and health care providers to address patients' needs more effectively and to achieve better adherence to treatment recommendations.

9.

Olincy A, Martin L. Diminished suppression of the P50 auditory evoked potential in bipolar disorder subjects with a history of psychosis. Am J Psychiatry. 2005 Jan;162(1):43-9.

Department of Veterans Affairs and University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver 80262, USA.

OBJECTIVE: People with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, and bipolar illness share clinical symptoms, biological findings, and genetic susceptibility. Diminished suppression of the P50 auditory evoked potential is a phenotype used in studies of genetic susceptibility in schizophrenia. In patients with acute mania, this inhibitory deficit has been correlated with severity of clinical symptoms. This study addresses whether diminished P50 auditory evoked potential suppression represents a phenotype associated with psychosis in bipolar illness. METHOD: The P50 auditory evoked potential response to paired stimuli was measured in 64 subjects with bipolar illness. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV and a life chart determined diagnosis. The Beck Depression Inventory, Young Mania Rating Scale, and the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale measured severity of current illness. Groups were compared with previously collected data from 36 schizophrenia patients and 42 healthy subjects. RESULTS: P50 suppression significantly differed between bipolar disorder patients with a lifetime history of psychosis and healthy subjects. P50 suppression in bipolar disorder patients without a history of psychosis did not differ from that of the healthy subjects. Severity of current symptoms did not correlate with P50 suppression. CONCLUSIONS: A longitudinal history of psychosis in subjects with bipolar illness was associated with diminished suppression of the P50 auditory evoked potential. This deficit may represent a common physiological mechanism associated with the vulnerability to psychosis in people with bipolar illness as well as in people with schizophrenia.

10.

Takahashi T, Murata T, Hamada T, Omori M, Kosaka H, Kikuchi M, Yoshida H, Wada Y. Changes in EEG and autonomic nervous activity during meditation and their association with personality traits. Int J Psychophysiol. 2005 Feb;55(2):199-207.

Department of Neuropsychiatry, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Matsuoka-cho, Fukui 910-1193, Japan.

Meditation is the attainment of a restful yet fully alert physical and mental state practiced by many as a self-regulatory approach to emotion management, but the psychophysiological properties and personality traits that characterize this meditative state have not been adequately studied. We quantitatively analyzed changes in psychophysiological parameters during Zen meditation in 20 normal adults, and evaluated the results in association with personality traits assessed by Cloninger's Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). During meditation, increases were observed in fast theta power and slow alpha power on EEG predominantly in the frontal area, whereas an increase in the normalized unit of high-frequency (nuHF) power (as a parasympathetic index) and decreases in the normalized unit of low-frequency (nuLF) power and LF/HF (as sympathetic indices) were observed through analyses of heart rate variability. We analyzed the possible correlations among these changes in terms of the percent change during meditation using the control condition as the baseline. The percent change in slow alpha EEG power in the frontal area, reflecting enhanced internalized attention, was negatively correlated with that in nuLF as well as in LF/HF and was positively correlated with the novelty seeking score (which has been suggested to be associated with dopaminergic activity). The percent change in fast theta power in the frontal area, reflecting enhanced mindfulness, was positively correlated with that in nuHF and also with the harm avoidance score (which has been suggested to be associated with serotonergic activity). These results suggest that internalized attention and mindfulness as two major core factors of behaviors of mind during meditation are characterized by different combinations of psychophysiological properties and personality traits.

  1. Acevedo JG, Lopez JL, Cortes AM, Bores AM, Cortes GM, Castro IP. In vitro anti-Vibrio cholerae activity of essential oil from Lepechinia caulescens. Fitoterapia. 2005 Jan;76(1):104-7.

  2. Adams M, Pacher T, Greger H, Bauer R. Inhibition of leukotriene biosynthesis by stilbenoids from Stemona species. J Nat Prod. 2005 Jan;68(1):83-5.

  3. Ahmad R, Ali AM, Israf DA, Ismail NH, Shaari K, Lajis NH. Antioxidant, radical-scavenging, anti-inflammatory, cytotoxic and antibacterial activities of methanolic extracts of some Hedyotis species. Life Sci. 2005 Mar 11;76(17):1953-64.

  4. Andreasen NC. Vulnerability to mental illnesses: gender makes a difference, and so does providing good psychiatric care. Am J Psychiatry. 2005 Feb;162(2):211-3.

  5. Augustin M, Bock PR, Hanisch J, Karasmann M, Schneider B. Safety and efficacy of the long-term adjuvant treatment of primary intermediate- to high-risk malignant melanoma (UICC/AJCC stage II and III) with a standardized fermented European mistletoe (Viscum album L.) extract. Results from a multicenter, comparative, epidemiological cohort study in Germany and Switzerland. Arzneimittelforschung. 2005;55(1):38-49.

  6. Balachandran P, Govindarajan R. Cancer--an ayurvedic perspective. Pharmacol Res. 2005 Jan;51(1):19-30. Review.

  7. Barrero AF, Quilez del Moral JF, Lara A, Herrador MM. Antimicrobial activity of sesquiterpenes from the essential oil of Juniperus thurifera. Planta Med. 2005 Jan;71(1):67-71.

  8. Beeli G, Esslen M, Jancke L. Synaesthesia: when coloured sounds taste sweet. Nature. 2005 Mar 3;434(7029):38.

  9. Berry J.  The nebulous spirit. I started to read everything I could get my hands on about HIV and spirituality. Posit Aware. 2005 Mar-Apr;16(2):30-1.

  10. Bharti, Shahi VK, Kumar A, Mishra DK. Obesity Metabolic disorder and its ayurvedic approach. Aryavaidyan. 2004 Nov- 2005 Jan;18(2):83-86.

  11. Bjarnason I, Bjarnason A.  Unorthodox treatment for irritable bowel syndrome? Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2005 Jan;17(1):1-3. Review.

  12. Bloomberg GR, Chen E. The relationship of psychologic stress with childhood asthma. Immunol Allergy Clin North Am. 2005 Feb;25(1):83-105. Review.

  13. Bodin P, Fagevik Olsen M, Bake B, Kreuter M. Effects of abdominal binding on breathing patterns during breathing exercises in persons with tetraplegia. Spinal Cord. 2005 Feb;43(2):117-22.

  14. Booker R. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: non-pharmacological approaches.  Br J Nurs. 2005 Jan 13-26;14(1):14-8. Review.

  15. Bradley R, Greene J, Russ E, Dutra L, Westen D.  A multidimensional meta-analysis of psychotherapy for PTSD. Am J Psychiatry. 2005 Feb;162(2):214-27. Review.

  16. Brown AC, Shovic A, Ibrahim SA, Holck P, Huang A. A non-dairy probiotic's (poi) influence on changing the gastrointestinal tract's microflora environment. Altern Ther Health Med. 2005 Jan-Feb;11(1):58-64.

  17. Bryant C. "God is our hope". Health Prog. 2005 Jan-Feb;86(1):53-5, 62.

  18. Buckle J. Aromatherapy for health professionals. Holistic practices help with life transitions. Beginnings. 2005 Winter;25(1):18-9.

  19. Bugbee ME, Wellisch DK, Arnott IM, Maxwell JR, Kirsch DL, Sayre JW, Bassett LW. Breast core-needle biopsy: clinical trial of relaxation technique versus medication versus no intervention for anxiety reduction. Radiology. 2005 Jan;234(1):73-8.

  20. Burris TP, Montrose C, Houck KA, Osborne HE, Bocchinfuso WP, Yaden BC, Cheng CC, Zink RW, Barr RJ, Hepler CD, Krishnan V, Bullock HA, Burris LL, Galvin RJ, Bramlett K, Stayrook KR.  The hypolipidemic natural product guggulsterone is a promiscuous steroid receptor ligand. Mol Pharmacol. 2005 Mar;67(3):948-54.

  21. Burton B. Australia backs tougher regulation for complementary health products. BMJ. 2005 Mar 19;330(7492):619.

  22. Chandre R. Murthy N KHH VSS, Singh RH. Evaluation of the efficacy of Kusmandaghrta in the management of depressive illness. Aryavaidyan. 2004 Nov- 2005 Jan;18(2):87-90.

  23. Chrubasik S, Kunzel O, Thanner J, Conradt C, Black A.  A 1-year follow-up after a pilot study with Doloteffin for low back pain. Phytomedicine. 2005 Jan;12(1-2):1-9.

  24. Church TR. United Kingdom back pain exercise and manipulation (UK BEAM) trial: manipulation alone costs more than other options so why is it recommended? BMJ. 2005 Mar 19;330(7492):674; author reply 674.

  25. Cohen MH, Hrbek A, Davis RB, Schachter SC, Kemper KJ, Boyer EW, Eisenberg DM. Emerging credentialing practices, malpractice liability policies, and guidelines governing complementary and alternative medical practices and dietary supplement recommendations: a descriptive study of 19 integrative health care centers in the United States. Arch Intern Med. 2005 Feb 14;165(3):289-95. Erratum in: Arch Intern Med. 2005 Apr 11;165(7):730.

  26. Cohen MH, Sandler L, Hrbek A, Davis RB, Eisenberg DM. Policies pertaining to complementary and alternative medical therapies in a random sample of 39 academic health centers. Altern Ther Health Med. 2005 Jan-Feb;11(1):36-40.

  27. Cohen-Katz J, Wiley SD, Capuano T, Baker DM, Shapiro S. The effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction on nurse stress and burnout, Part II: A quantitative and qualitative study. Holist Nurs Pract. 2005 Jan-Feb;19(1):26-35.

  28. Dalen JE. How can a conventionally trained physician support integrative medicine? Altern Ther Health Med. 2005 Jan-Feb;11(1):10-1.

  29. 12350.     De Smet PA.  Herbal medicine in Europe--relaxing regulatory standards. N Engl J Med. 2005 Mar 24;352(12):1176-8.

  30. Deepamol K, Vijayan D, Manjula R, Mohan S, Valsa AK. Antibacaterial activity of Eugenia jambolana. Aryavaidyan. 2004 Nov- 2005 Jan;18(2):75-79.

  31. Dog TL. Tieraona Low Dog, MD educator, scientist, and herbal medicine expert. Interview by Karolyn A Gazella. Altern Ther Health Med. 2005 Jan-Feb;11(1):84-91.
    Easterford K, Clough P, Comish S, Lawton L, Duncan S.  The use of complementary medicines and alternative practitioners in a cohort of patients with epilepsy. Epilepsy Behav. 2005 Feb;6(1):59-62.

  32. Eftekhar F, Yousefzadi M, Tafakori V. Antimicrobial activity of Datura innoxia and Datura stramonium. Fitoterapia. 2005 Jan;76(1):118-20. 

  33. Ernst E. Complementary treatment: who cares how it works, as long as it does? Lancet Oncol. 2005 Mar;6(3):131-2.

  34. Ernst E. Second thoughts on integrative medicine. J Fam Pract. 2005 Feb;54(2):154-5.

  35. Fields N. Float like a butterfly...yoga and birth. Pract Midwife. 2005 Jan;8(1):22-5. Review.

  36. Gardner M, Ogden J. Do GPs practice what they preach? A questionnaire study of GPs' treatments for themselves and their patients. Patient Educ Couns. 2005 Jan;56(1):112-5.

  37. Gonsalkorale WM, Whorwell PJ. Hypnotherapy in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2005 Jan;17(1):15-20. Review.

  38. Grabois M. Management of chronic low back pain. Am J Phys Med Rehabil. 2005 Mar;84(3 Suppl):S29-41. Review.

  39. Hoblyn JC, Brooks JO 3rd.  Herbal supplements in older adults. Consider interactions and adverse events that may result from supplement use. Geriatrics. 2005 Feb;60(2):18, 22-3.

  40. Honda K, Jacobson JS. Use of complementary and alternative medicine among United States adults: the influences of personality, coping strategies, and social support. Prev Med. 2005 Jan;40(1):46-53.

  41. Hrastinger A, Dietz B, Bauer R, Sagraves R, Mahady G. Is there clinical evidence supporting the use of botanical dietary supplements in children? J Pediatr. 2005 Mar;146(3):311-7. Review.

  42. Iwasaki K, Satoh-Nakagawa T, Maruyama M, Monma Y, Nemoto M, Tomita N, Tanji H, Fujiwara H, Seki T, Fujii M, Arai H, Sasaki H. A randomized, observer-blind, controlled trial of the traditional Chinese medicine Yi-Gan San for improvement of behavioral and psychological symptoms and activities of daily living in dementia patients. J Clin Psychiatry. 2005 Feb;66(2):248-52.

  43. Janisch KM, Milde J, Elstner EF. Evaluation and standardisation of the antioxidant properties of two Indian remedies with biochemical test assays. Arzneimittelforschung. 2005;55(1):30-7.

  44. Joshi PC, Mandal S, Das PC, Adhikari P. Preliminary studies (in vitro) on anticoagulant activity of naturally occurring bis-coumarins. Aryavaidyan. 2004 Aug-Oct;18(1):33-36.

  45. Kim SD, Kim HS. Effects of a relaxation breathing exercise on fatigue in haemopoietic stem cell transplantation patients. J Clin Nurs. 2005 Jan;14(1):51-5.

  46. Kulkarni OJ. Thalassemia syndrome An ayurvedic approach. Aryavaidyan. 2004 Nov- 2005 Jan;18(2):95-99.

  47. Kumar A, D, Prasad MVV. Anti microbial activity of Triphalacurnam. Aryavaidyan. 2004 Nov- 2005 Jan;18(2):109-111.

  48. Kurian P, Thomas M. Neem oil a preventive against leptospiral infection in man. Aryavaidyan. 2004 Aug-Oct;18(1):41-44.

  49. Lee CO. Complementary and alternative medicine patients are talking about: PC-SPES. Clin J Oncol Nurs. 2005 Feb;9(1):113-4. Review.

  50. Lindahl MG, Barrett R, Peterson D, Zheng L, Nedrow A. Development of an integrative patient history intake tool: a Delphi study. Altern Ther Health Med. 2005 Jan-Feb;11(1):52-6.

  51. Linde K, Berner M, Egger M, Mulrow C. St John's wort for depression: meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. Br J Psychiatry. 2005 Feb;186:99-107. Review.

  52. Linde K, Knuppel L. Large-scale observational studies of hypericum extracts in patients with depressive disorders--a systematic review. Phytomedicine. 2005 Jan;12(1-2):148-57. Review.

  53. Ma BY. Research funding in complementary medicine.  R Soc Med. 2005 Jan;98(1):44.

  54. Nelson JB. Meditation and the art of diabetes management. Diabetes Self Manag. 2005 Jan-Feb;22(1):14, 16-7, 19.

  55. Ohgushi K, Ano Y. The relationship between musical pitch and temporal responses of the auditory nerve fibers. J Physiol Anthropol Appl Human Sci. 2005 Jan;24(1):99-101.

  56. Olincy A, Martin L. Diminished suppression of the P50 auditory evoked potential in bipolar disorder subjects with a history of psychosis. Am J Psychiatry. 2005 Jan;162(1):43-9.

  57. Parkman CA. Regulatory issues in CAM. Case Manager. 2005 Jan-Feb;16(1):17-8, 23.

  58. Pasupathy S, Bikshapathi T. Standardization of anupana. Aryavaidyan. 2004 Aug-Oct;18(1):30-32.

  59. Pihko E, Kujala T, Mickos A, Antell H, Alku P, Byring R, Korkman M. Magnetic fields evoked by speech sounds in preschool children. Clin Neurophysiol. 2005 Jan;116(1):112-9. 

  60. Pizzamiglio L, Aprile T, Spitoni G, Pitzalis S, Bates E, D'Amico S, Di Russo F.  Separate neural systems for processing action- or non-action-related sounds. Neuroimage. 2005 Feb 1;24(3):852-61.

  61. Popoola MM. Living with diabetes: The holistic experiences of Nigerians and African Americans. Holist Nurs Pract. 2005 Jan-Feb;19(1):10-6.

  62. Rajalakshmi A N, Gopal V. Thailam - a popular and promising siddha formulation. Antiseptic, Madurai 2004, 101(7), 295-6.

  63. Rosted P, Warnakulasuriya S. A survey on the uses of acupuncture by a group of UK dentists. Br Dent J. 2005 Feb 12;198(3):139-43.

  64. Rowley SM. Headaches in children and adolescents. A blueprint for pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic approaches. Adv Nurse Pract. 2005 Feb;13(2):31-2, 34, 37-43. Review.

  65. Santelmann H, Howard JM. Yeast metabolic products, yeast antigens and yeasts as possible triggers for irritable bowel syndrome. Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2005 Jan;17(1):21-6. Review.

  66. Sarkar PK, Choudhury AK, Prajapati PK. Role of gandhaka (sulphur) in skin diseases Apharmaco-clinical explanation. Aryavaidyan. 2004 Aug-Oct;18(1):18-22.

  67. Sarma RK, Baishya B, Chakravarty A, Barman NN. Study of hepatoprotective action of Terminalia chebula. Aryavaidyan. 2004 Aug-Oct;18(1):14-17.

  68. Shastry A, Chary P. Differential gene expression in neem takes root in ayurveda. Aryavaidayan 2004, 17(3), 162-5.

  69. Shirato S. How CAM helps systemic lupus erythematosus. Holist Nurs Pract. 2005 Jan-Feb;19(1):36-9. Review.

  70. Shokeen P, Ray K, Bala M, Tandon V. Preliminary studies on activity of Ocimum sanctum, Drynaria quercifolia, and Annona squamosa against Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Sex Transm Dis. 2005 Feb;32(2):106-11.

  71. Sinha G. Medicine of the masses. Nat Med. 2005 Jan;11(1):9-10.

  72. Smukler D. Unauthorized minds: how "theory of mind" theory misrepresents autism. Ment Retard. 2005 Feb;43(1):11-24.

  73. Smyth J. Homeopathy and rational therapeutics. Eur J Cancer. 2005 Jan;41(1):7-8; discussion 9-11, 12-4.

  74. Srivastava VK, Upadhyay BN. Concept and management of hypertension in ayurveda. Aryavaidayan 2004, 17(2), 106-9.

  75. Szegedi A, Kohnen R, Dienel A, Kieser M. Acute treatment of moderate to severe depression with hypericum extract WS 5570 (St John's wort): randomised controlled double blind non-inferiority trial versus paroxetine. BMJ. 2005 Mar 5;330(7490):503.

  76. Takahashi T, Murata T, Hamada T, Omori M, Kosaka H, Kikuchi M, Yoshida H, Wada Y. Changes in EEG and autonomic nervous activity during meditation and their association with personality traits. Int J Psychophysiol. 2005 Feb;55(2):199-207.

  77. Tamizh Mani T, Mukherjee P K, Shanmugarajan T, Manimaran S, Subbruaj T, Suresh B. Antimicrobial potential of certain medicinal plants available in Nilgiris. Antiseptic, Madurai 2004, 101(7), 291-2.

  78. Tindle HA, Davis RB, Phillips RS, Eisenberg DM. Trends in use of complementary and alternative medicine by US adults: 1997-2002. Altern Ther Health Med. 2005 Jan-Feb;11(1):42-9.

  79. Tripathy PK. Irritable bowel syndrome An ayurvedic view. Aryavaidyan. 2004 Aug-Oct;18(1):54-55.

  80. Tveito TH, Eriksen HR.  United Kingdom back pain exercise and manipulation (UK BEAM) trial: is manipulation the most cost effective addition to "best care"? BMJ. 2005 Mar 19;330(7492):674; author reply 674.

  81. Uhlig T, Larsson C, Hjorth AG, Odegard S, Kvien TK. No improvement in a pilot study of tai chi exercise in rheumatoid arthritis. Ann Rheum Dis. 2005 Mar;64(3):507-9.

  82. Upchurch DM, Chyu L. Use of complementary and alternative medicine among American women. Womens Health Issues. 2005 Jan-Feb;15(1):5-13.

  83. Valarmati R. Sundari SKK, Ramya S, Renugadevi T. Anti arthritic activity of Cheriya Rasnadi Kashayam. Aryavaidyan. 2004 Aug-Oct;18(1):49-50.

  84. Verhoef M, Epstein M, Brundin-Mather R, Boon H, Jones A. Introducing medical students to CAM: response to Oppel et al. Can Fam Physician. 2005 Feb;51:191-2.

  85. Wahner-Roedler DL, Elkin PL, Vincent A, Thompson JM, Oh TH, Loehrer LL, Mandrekar JN, Bauer BA.  Use of complementary and alternative medical therapies by patients referred to a fibromyalgia treatment program at a tertiary care center. Mayo Clin Proc. 2005 Jan;80(1):55-60.

  86. Werneke U. A guide to using complementary alternative medicines in cancer. Nurs Times. 2005 Feb 1-7;101(5):32-5. Review.

  87. Wright S, Sayre-Adams J. Self discovery. Nurs Stand. 2005 Feb 9-15;19(22):14-5.

  88. Wynn SG, Wolpe PR. The majority view of ethics and professionalism in alternative medicine. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2005 Feb 15;226(4):516-20.

  89. Xia Q, Yuan L, Yang XN, Tang WF, Jiang JM. Comparison of integrated Chinese and Western medicine with and without somatostatin supplement in the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis. World J Gastroenterol. 2005 Feb 21;11(7):1073-6.

  90. Zhou XJ, Zheng K. Treatment of 140 cerebral palsied children with a combined method based on traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and western medicine. J Zhejiang Univ Sci B. 2005 Jan;6(1):57-60.

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October, 2005

Some Selected Abstract::

1.  

Abraham S, Kumar MS, Sehgal PK, Nitish S, Jayakumar ND. Evaluation of the inhibitory effect of triphala on PMN-type matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9).  J Periodontol. 2005 Apr;76(4):497-502.

Department of Periodontia, Saveetha Dental College and Hospitals, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.

BACKGROUND: This study evaluated the inhibitory activity of triphala on PMN-type matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9) expressed in adult periodontitis patients and compared its activity with another ayurvedic drug, kamillosan, and doxycycline, which has known inhibitory activity. METHODS: Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were extracted from gingival tissue samples from 10 patients (six males, four females) with chronic periodontitis. Tissue extracts were treated with the drug solutions, the inhibition was analyzed by gelatin zymography, and the percentage of inhibition was determined by a gel documentation system. RESULTS: The activity of MMPs was significantly decreased with the use of the drugs. Triphala showed a 76.6% reduction of MMP-9 activity, whereas kamillosan showed a 46.36% reduction at a concentration of 1,500 microg/ml (crude extract) and doxycycline showed a 58.7% reduction at a concentration of 300 microg/ml (pure drug). CONCLUSION: The present study showed the strong inhibitory activity of triphala on PMN-type MMPs involved in the extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation during periodontitis.

2.  

Arold G, Donath F, Maurer A, Diefenbach K, Bauer S, Henneicke-von Zepelin HH, Friede M, Roots I. No relevant interaction with alprazolam, caffeine, tolbutamide, and digoxin by treatment with a low-hyperforin St John's wort extract. Planta Med. 2005 Apr;71(4):331-7.

Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, University Medical Center Charite, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.

We evaluated the pharmacokinetic interaction between a low-hyperforin St John's wort (SJW) extract and alprazolam, caffeine, tolbutamide, and digoxin. Previous reports on other SJW products had shown remarkably decreased plasma concentrations of certain co-medicated drugs, which was attributed to an inducing effect of SJW on cytochrome P-450 (CYP) and p-glycoprotein (p-gp) activity. Two randomised, placebo-controlled studies were performed with 28 healthy volunteers (age 18 - 55 years) in each study. In study A, single doses of alprazolam (1 mg; substrate of CYP3A4) and caffeine (100 mg; CYP1A2) were given on days 1 and 11. In study B, single doses of tolbutamide (500 mg, days 1 and 11; CYP2C9) and multiple doses of digoxin (0.75 mg on days -2 and -1, 0.25 mg/die on days 1 to 11; p-gp) were given. The participants received SJW (Esbericum capsules; 240 mg/die of extract, 3.5 mg hyperforin) or placebo on days 2 to 11. Blood for pharmacokinetic analysis was drawn on days 1 and 11. No statistically significant differences were found in the primary kinetic parameter, AUC0 - 24, of alprazolam, caffeine (AUC0 - 12), paraxanthine, tolbutamide, 4-hydroxytolbutamide, and digoxin between the placebo group and the SJW group at the end of the study. The SJW-induced change in AUCs was less than 12 % of the initial median AUC of the participants in studies A and B, thus clinically irrelevant. On day 11, trough concentrations were 2.0 (range 0.6 - 4.1) microg/L and 1.0 (0.2 - 3.9) microg/L for hypericin and pseudohypericin, respectively, whereas hyperforin concentrations were below the quantification limit (< 1 microg/L). Kinetics of investigated probe drugs were only marginally influenced by concomitant treatment with Esbericum capsules. This may be due in particular to the low hyperforin plasma concentration as this SJW component has been shown to activate the PXR receptor which regulates expression of CYP3A4 and p-gp. Our findings corroborate the view that reports about interactions of other SJW extracts seem not to be predictive for the product we studied.

3.  

Barnes S, Prasain J. Current progress in the use of traditional medicines and nutraceuticals. Curr Opin Plant Biol. 2005 Jun;8(3):324-8.

Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, McCallum Research Building, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1918 University Boulevard, Birmingham, Alabama 35294, USA. sbarnes@uab.edu

Traditional medicines in the form of botanical dietary supplements and nutraceuticals have found a place in 21st century healthcare. They nonetheless all contain compounds that are foreign to humans (i.e. xenobiotics) and that are subject to the same pharmacological issues encountered by synthetic therapeutic agents. It is crucial therefore for all parties, the medical profession, investigative scientists, the regulatory agencies and the public, to understand the particular characteristics of botanicals and nutraceuticals and their potential for success and failure in preventing and confronting disease.

4.  

Bhimani S.  Clinical study of efficacy of glycoban cap in patients of non- insulin dependent diabetes (NIDDM) mellitus. Antiseptic. 2005 Feb; 102(2): 71-75.

Mangalam Hospital, 25, New Jagnath, Behind Astron Cinema, Rajkot

Latest WHO estimate: By 2025 the number of diabetes will rise to 228 million (1985-84 million). Diabetes (Madhumeha) mean honey urine is a complex metabolic disorder. The early model of the diseases as dysfunction of metabolism and transport of glucose is no longer adequate. We now know that lipids, proteins, aminoacids, ketones and hormones are involved. Now the liver muscles, adipose tissue and the brain are the ports of the total picture. Allopathic treatments are done mainly by Oral Hypoglycaemic Agents (OHA). No attempt is made to restore the pancreases, so by paying the needed emphasis on this newly developing insight a group effort was put forward for the patients of latent and prediabetics by launching a well designed "Clinical evaluation study on GLUCOBAN cap. " at our hospital. Here it has to be noted that the each of the following ingredients being used in the formation of Glycoban cap. is nature based and has been found with having specific mode of action in restoring the process according to the classical text book of Ayurveda.

5.  

Browall M, Magri M, Selvekerova S, Madsen E, Milovics L, Bruyns I, Gudmundsdottir G, Hummerston S, Ahmad AM, Platin N, Kearney N, Patiraki E. Use of complementary and alternative medicine in cancer patients: a European survey. Ann Oncol. 2005 Apr;16(4):655-63.

School of Nursing, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. alex.molassiotis@manchester.ac.uk

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to explore the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in cancer patients across a number of European countries. METHODS: A descriptive survey design was developed. Fourteen countries participated in the study and data was collected through a descriptive questionnaire from 956 patients. RESULTS: Data suggest that CAM is popular among cancer patients with 35.9% using some form of CAM (range among countries 14.8% to 73.1%). A heterogeneous group of 58 therapies were identified as being used. Herbal medicines and remedies were the most commonly used CAM therapies, together with homeopathy, vitamins/minerals, medicinal teas, spiritual therapies and relaxation techniques. Herbal medicine use tripled from use before diagnosis to use since diagnosis with cancer. Multivariate analysis suggested that the profile of the CAM user was that of younger people, female and with higher educational level. The source of information was mainly from friends/family and the media, while physicians and nurses played a small part in providing CAM-related information. The majority used CAM to increase the body's ability to fight cancer or improve physical and emotional well-being, and many seemed to have benefited from using CAM (even though the benefits were not necessarily related to the initial reason for using CAM). Some 4.4% of patients, however, reported side-effects, mostly transient. CONCLUSIONS: It is imperative that health professionals explore the use of CAM with their cancer patients, educate them about potentially beneficial therapies in light of the limited available evidence of effectiveness, and work towards an integrated model of health-care provision.

6.  

Debnath PK; Bhattacharya TK; Acharya SB. Effect of PGE, on blood 5-HT turnover in peripheral tissues in rats. Indian Journal of Physiology and Allied Sciences. 1994 Oct; 48(4): 174-8

Department of Internal Medicine, J.B. Roy State Ayurvedic Medical College, Calcutta.

5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) is believed to be implicated in different physiological as well as diseased conditions of thyroid gland like other organs. An interrelationship between 5-HT and prostaglandins (PGs) seem to exist in different physiological functions both in central nervous system as well as in the periphery. PGE1 in varying doses (0.1, 0.4 and 0.8 mg/kg.) could not influence the 5-HT level in thyroid gland in our studies as also in stomach and intestine in rats. Whereas it increased in blood and brain tissues with a predetermined dose of 0.4 mg/kg. and in uterus, in doses of 0.1 and 0.4 mg/kg. (subcut.) irrespective of its oestrus cycle status.

7.  

Dunn JD, Cannon HE, Lewis T, Shane-McWhorter L. Development of a complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) pharmacy and therapeutics (P&T) subcommittee and CAM guide for providers.  J Manag Care Pharm. 2005 Apr;11(3):252-8.

Intermountain Health Care Health Plans, 4646 West Lake Park Blvd., Suite N3, Salt Lake City, UT 84120, USA. jeffrey.dunn@ihc.com

OBJECTIVE: The objective was 2-fold: (1) to evaluate the feasibility and value of developing a Pharmacy and Therapeutics (P&T) subcommittee aimed at scientifically evaluating complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) products for an integrated managed care organization (IMCO) and (2) to assess provider acceptance and usefulness of a CAM guide. METHODS: Three factors drove the decision to form a CAM P&T subcommittee to evaluate current commonly used CAM products: (1) physicians, pharmacists, and dieticians expressed a desire for an easy-to-use, scientifically based mechanism for evaluating the ever-increasing number of CAM products; (2) Intermountain Health Care Health Plans (Health Plans), the insurance division of this IMCO, offers access to certain CAM products to its members at a discounted price in an effort to remain competitive with other IMCOs; and (3) this IMCO owns and operates more than a dozen community pharmacies that sell CAM products. Some IMCO clinicians believed an efficacy and safety review of the products offered through the organization was warranted. Subcommittee members included clinical pharmacists (IMCO and university), pharmacy directors, a community pharmacist, practicing physicians (from the drug P&T committee), a medical director, dieticians and nutritionists, and a representative from the Health Plans sales department. The primary outcome was the development of a CAM guide listing recommendations for use of CAM products. Outcome measures included survey results (survey sent with guide to physicians and (pharmacists) regarding acceptance and usefulness of the guide. RESULTS: The CAM P&T subcommittee met monthly to evaluate current commonly used CAM products. A CAM guide was developed in paperback and electronic versions. The electronic version was downloadable to handheld devices. Thousands of CAM guides were disseminated to IMCO-employed physicians, network pharmacies, dieticians, and nutritionists affiliated with this managed care organization. A survey that accompanied distribution of the first CAM guide in 2003 showed that 89% of physicians and pharmacists felt that the guide would be somewhat or very helpful as a counseling aide; the remainder was unsure. A second CAM guide was disseminated one year later, in 2004. The accompanying survey showed that 78% of physicians and 97% of pharmacists felt that the guide would be somewhat or very helpful as a counseling aide; 7% of physicians and 3% of pharmacists felt the guide would be unhelpful. CONCLUSION: A CAM guide developed through the work of a subcommittee of the P&T committee of this IMCO appears to be widely accepted by pharmacists and physicians. A CAM guide should be easy to use and available online with the ability to download to a handheld device.

8.

Gabbard GO. Mind, brain, and personality disorders. Am J Psychiatry. 2005 Apr;162(4):648-55.

Menninger Department of Psychiatry, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, MS HMC500, Houston, TX 77030, USA. ggabbard@bcm.tmc.edu

OBJECTIVE: The use of the terms "mind" and "brain" in psychiatry is often associated with a set of polarities. Concepts such as environment, psychosocial, and psychotherapy are linked with "mind," while genes, biology, and medication are often associated with "brain." The author examines these dichotomies as they apply to personality disorders. METHOD: Research on antisocial and borderline personality disorders that is relevant to these dichotomies is evaluated. The implications of the findings for the understanding of pathogenesis and treatment are reconsidered. RESULTS: In the clinical setting, it is problematic to lump together terms such as "genes," "brain," and "biological" as though they are separate and distinct from terms such as "environment," "mind," and "psychosocial." These dichotomies are problematic, because genes and environment are inextricably intertwined in the pathogenesis of personality disorders, psychosocial experiences may result in permanent changes in the brain, and psychotherapy may have its effect by altering brain structure and function. The "theory of mind" is a useful construct for bridging "mind" and "brain" in the treatment of personality disorders. CONCLUSIONS: Severe personality disorders are best understood and treated without "either-or" dichotomies of brain and mind. Each domain has a different language, however, and the language of the mind is necessary to help the patient develop a theory of mind.

9.

Graham RE, Ahn AC, Davis RB, O'Connor BB, Eisenberg DM, Phillips RS. Use of complementary and alternative medical therapies among racial and ethnic minority adults: results from the 2002 National Health Interview Survey. J Natl Med Assoc. 2005 Apr;97(4):535-45.

Division for Research and Education in Complementary and Integrative Medical Therapies, Osher Institute, Harvard Medical School, 401 Park Drive, Suite 22A-West, Boston, MA 02215, USA. robert_graham@hms.harvard.edu

PURPOSE: Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among ethnic minority populations is poorly understood. We sought to examine CAM use in Hispanics, non-Hispanic blacks and non-Hispanic whites. METHODS: We analyzed data from the Alternative Health Supplement to the 2002 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), including information on 19 different CAM therapies used in the past 12 months. RESULTS: An estimated 34% of Hispanic, non-Hispanic black and non-Hispanic white adults in the United States used at least one CAM therapy (excluding prayer) during the prior 12 months (2002). CAM use was highest for non-Hispanic whites (36%), followed by Hispanics (27%) and non-Hispanic blacks (26%). Non-Hispanic whites were more likely to use herbal medicine, relaxation techniques and chiropractic more frequently than Hispanics and non-Hispanic blacks. After controlling for other sociodemographic factors, Hispanic and non-Hispanic black races/ethnicities were associated with less CAM use, with adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) of 0.78 (0.70, 0.87) and 0.71 (0.65, 0.78), respectively. Hispanics cited using CAM because conventional medical treatments were too expensive more frequently than non-Hispanic blacks or whites. Hispanics had the highest provider nondisclosure rates (68.5%), followed by non-Hispanic blacks (65.1%) and non-Hispanic whites (58.1%). CONCLUSIONS: Excluding prayer, Hispanics and non-Hispanic blacks used CAM less frequently than non-Hispanic whites and were less likely to disclose their use to their healthcare provider. Further research is needed to improve our understanding of the disparities in CAM use.

10.

Hana G, Bar-Sela G, Zhana D, Mashiach T, Robinson E. The use of complementary and alternative therapies by cancer patients in northern Israel. Isr Med Assoc J. 2005 Apr;7(4):243-7.

Quality Improvement Unit, Rambam Medical Center, Haifa, Israel.

BACKGROUND: The use of complementary and alternative medicine has increased over the last decade in the western world. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the extent and characteristics of CAM use among cancer patients in northern Israel. METHODS: Telephone interviews were conducted with 2,176 newly registered cancer patients or their family members, at least 1 year following referral. RESULTS: The rates of CAM use varied significantly according to demographic characteristics and chemotherapy treatment, from 3% in the basically educated elderly group up to 69% of educated Israeli-born Jews younger than 70 years receiving chemotherapy. The overall rate of CAM use was 17%. The most influential factors determining CAM use were academic or high school education, chemotherapy treatment, Israel as country of birth, and age 41-50 years. All patients used CAM in addition to conventional therapies. Less than half of them reported it to their physicians. The most frequently used treatments were various chemical, biological, botanic and homeopathy remedies. Friends and relatives were the main recommenders of CAM. Most CAM users reported that they used CAM because they believed it "strengthens the immune system," alleviates side effects of chemotherapy, improves quality of life, and helps to overcome pain and stress; 62% of them reported subjective beneficial effects. CONCLUSIONS: A predicting module of CAM user patients was built that may help physicians initiate conversations with their patients on CAM use. Expanding physicians' knowledge on CAM methods will encourage them to provide additional advice, promote the use of beneficial therapies, and inform patients about potentially harmful methods.

11.

Haraldsson K, Fridlund B, Baigi A, Marklund B. The self-reported health condition of women after their participation in a stress management programme: a pilot study. Health Soc Care Community. 2005 May;13(3):224-30.

Primary Health Care Research and Development Unit, Halland County Council, Falkenberg, Sweden. katarina.haraldsson@lthalland.se

From a public health perspective, it is important to develop effective measures to deal with stress which are based on the individual's participation, such as stress management provided in group sessions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to compare and evaluate the self-reported health condition of women in terms of their general symptoms, stress and sense of coherence (SOC) after participation in a stress management programme. The intervention, which had a modified crossover design and involved 40 women divided into two groups (G1 and G2), comprised eight meetings, the content of which was both theoretical and practical, and included information about stress, stress management, massage and mental training. A questionnaire was filled in on three occasions: before and after the intervention (8 weeks later), and after another 8 weeks (16 weeks later). The questionnaire contained 60 items comprising background factors, general symptoms, stress and SOC. No significant differences existed between the groups at baseline. In favour of the intervention, significant differences were found between the groups with regard to fewer general symptoms (P = 0.035) as well as a tendency to stress reduction (P = 0.060). A comparison within groups showed that both groups had a significant reduction in symptoms after the intervention (G1, P = 0.002; and G2, P = 0.003) and in reduced stress (both P = 0.001). After a further 8 weeks, both groups still showed significantly fewer general symptoms and reduced stress, as well as significant improvements with regard to SOC (G1, P = 0.012; and G2, P = 0.026). These findings indicate that the combination of mental training and massage in this stress management programme had a positive influence on the women's health condition. The pilot study design could be used in a full-scale study with randomised groups.

12.

Hernandez-Reif M, Field T, Ironson G, Beutler J, Vera Y, Hurley J, Fletcher MA, Schanberg S, Kuhn C, Fraser M. Natural killer cells and lymphocytes increase in women with breast cancer following massage therapy. Int J Neurosci. 2005 Apr;115(4):495-510.

Touch Research Institutes, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33101, USA. mhernan4@med.miami.edu

Women diagnosed with breast cancer received massage therapy or practiced progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) for 30-min sessions 3 times a week for 5 weeks or received standard treatment. The massage therapy and relaxation groups reported less depressed mood, anxiety, and pain immediately after their first and last sessions. By the end of the study, however, only the massage therapy group reported being less depressed and less angry and having more vigor. Dopamine levels, Natural Killer cells, and lymphocytes also increased from the first to the last day of the study for the massage therapy group. These findings highlight the benefit of these complementary therapies, most particularly massage therapy, for women with breast cancer.

13.

Kabat-Zinn J. Jon Kabat-Zinn, PhD. Bringing mindfulness to medicine. Interview by Karolyn A. Gazella. Altern Ther Health Med. 2005 May-Jun;11(3):56-64. No abstract available.

Losier A, Taylor B, Fernandez CV. Use of alternative therapies by patients presenting to a pediatric emergency department. J Emerg Med. 2005 Apr;28(3):267-71.

Department of Emergency Medicine, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is used by some patients to supplement their health care. Information on the use of CAM in children who are not chronically ill is sparse. We conducted a survey of caregivers presenting to a tertiary pediatric Emergency Department to determine CAM use in this population. Six hundred twenty questionnaires (77.6% of those distributed) were available for analysis. Approximately 13% of caregivers reported using CAM for their child. The most common CAM therapies used were homeopathy (20%), prayer/spiritual approaches (19.7%), and massage therapy (16.7%). Age of child greater than 1 year was associated with CAM use (p < 0.05), as was parental higher education (p < 0.0001). Income, ethnicity, parental age, and chronic illness were not correlated with CAM use. CAM therapies are infrequently used in pediatric patients presenting to the Emergency Department.

14.

Mechanick JI. The rational use of dietary supplements and nutraceuticals in clinical medicine. Mt Sinai J Med. 2005 May;72(3):161-5.

Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Bone Diseases, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029, USA.

The rational use of dietary supplements and nutraceuticals (DS/N) is based on objective evaluation of the clinical evidence as well as subjective evaluation of the risks, benefits, economic costs, and potential drug interactions. Since the use of DS/N has skyrocketed, physicians must learn about them in order to better communicate with and care for their patients. There are many evidence-based and rational uses for DS/N, but profiteering and quackery must be avoided at all costs.

15.

Molassiotis A, Fernadez-Ortega P, Pud D, Ozden G, Scott JA, Panteli V, Margulies A,

Reuter-Lorenz PA, Lustig C. Brain aging: reorganizing discoveries about the aging mind. Curr Opin Neurobiol. 2005 Apr;15(2):245-51.

Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, 525 East University, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1109, USA. parl@umich.edu

New discoveries challenge the long-held view that aging is characterized by progressive loss and decline. Evidence for functional reorganization, compensation and effective interventions holds promise for a more optimistic view of neurocognitive status in later life. Complexities associated with assigning function to age-specific activation patterns must be considered relative to performance and in light of pathological aging. New biological and genetic markers, coupled with advances in imaging technologies, are enabling more precise characterization of healthy aging. This interdisciplinary, cognitive neuroscience approach reveals dynamic and optimizing processes in aging that might be harnessed to foster the successful aging of the mind.

16.

Sabina AB, Williams AL, Wall HK, Bansal S, Chupp G, Katz DL.Yoga intervention for adults with mild-to-moderate asthma: a pilot study. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2005 May;94(5):543-8.

Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center, Derby, Connecticut 06418, USA.

BACKGROUND: Preliminary studies investigating yoga and breath work for treating asthma have been promising. Several randomized controlled trials have shown a benefit from yoga postures and breathing vs control, but the control in these cases involved no intervention other than usual care. This study advances the field by providing an active control. OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness and feasibility of a yoga and breath work intervention for improving clinical indices and quality of life in adults with mild-to-moderate asthma. METHODS: A randomized, controlled, double-masked clinical trial was conducted between October 1, 2001, and March 31, 2003. Random assignment was made to either a 4-week yoga intervention that included postures and breath work or a stretching control condition. Outcome measures were evaluated at 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks and included the Mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire, rescue inhaler use, spirometry, symptom diaries, and health care utilization. RESULTS: Sixty-two participants were randomized to the intervention and control groups, and 45 completed the final follow-up measures. Intention-to-treat analysis was performed. Significant within-group differences in postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second and morning symptom scores were apparent in both groups at 4 and 16 weeks; however, no significant differences between groups were observed on any outcome measures. CONCLUSIONS: Iyengar yoga conferred no appreciable benefit in mild-to-moderate asthma. Circumstances under which yoga is of benefit in asthma management, if any, remain to be determined.

17.

Vigne J. Meditation and mental health. Indian Journal of Clinical Psychology. 1997 Mar; 24(1): 46-51.

Sant Niwas Marg, Kankhal, 249408, Hardwar, UP.

Meditation has contributed to mental health in India since the beginning of its civilization. It is now used along with psychotherapy in many places in the West. It should be studied by clinical psychologists in India, both theoretically and practically the result of this work could be one of their important contributions to the emerging world psychology. The psychological mechanisms through which meditation heals the mind are studied in some detail. The indications of meditation for various psychopathological patients are suggested.

 

13019.  Abraham S, Kumar MS, Sehgal PK, Nitish S, Jayakumar ND. Evaluation of the inhibitory effect of triphala on PMN-type matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9). J Periodontol. 2005 Apr;76(4):497-502.

13020.  Adzu B, Gamaniel K. Sedative effects of cassia singueana root bark. Journal of Natural Remedies. 2003 Jun; 3(2): 134-7.

13021.  Ager C, Gadsden W. Complementary therapies: moving forward. RCM Midwives. 2005 May;8(5):224-5.

13022.  Ahn AC, Kaptchuk TJ. Advancing acupuncture research. Altern Ther Health Med. 2005 May-Jun;11(3):40-5. Review.

13023.  Anand Kumar BH, Sachidanand YN. Herbal formulation in the treatment of different types of dermatitis. Indian Practitioner. 2001 Aug; 54(8): 571-5.

13024.  Arold G, Donath F, Maurer A, Diefenbach K, Bauer S, Henneicke-von Zepelin HH, Friede M, Roots I.   No relevant interaction with alprazolam, caffeine, tolbutamide, and digoxin by treatment with a low-hyperforin St John's wort extract. Planta Med. 2005 Apr;71(4):331-7.

13025.  Barnes S, Prasain J. Current progress in the use of traditional medicines and nutraceuticals. Curr Opin Plant Biol. 2005 Jun;8(3):324-8. Review.

13026.  Bartecchi CE. Fibromyalgia and complementary and alternative medicine. Mayo Clin Proc. 2005 Jun;80(6):826; author reply 826-7.

13027.  Basly JP, Lavier MC. Dietary phytoestrogens: potential selective estrogen enzyme modulators? Planta Med. 2005 Apr;71(4):287-94. Review.

13028.  Bellas A, Lafferty WE, Lind B, Tyree PT. Frequency, predictors, and expenditures for pediatric insurance claims for complementary and alternative medical professionals in Washington State. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2005 Apr;159(4):367-72.

13029.  Bhimani S. Clinical study of efficacy of glycoban cap in patients of non- insulin dependent diabetes (NIDDM) mellitus. Antiseptic. 2005 Feb; 102(2): 71-75.

13030.  Borrelli F, Capasso R, Aviello G, Pittler MH, Izzo AA. Effectiveness and safety of ginger in the treatment of pregnancy-induced nausea and vomiting. Obstet Gynecol. 2005 Apr;105(4):849-56. Review.

13031.  Broom A. Using qualitative interviews in CAM research: a guide to study design, data collection and data analysis. Complement Ther Med. 2005 Mar;13(1):65-73.

13032.  Bruno JJ, Ellis JJ. Herbal use among US elderly: 2002 National Health Interview Survey. Ann Pharmacother. 2005 Apr;39(4):643-8.

13033.  Bruton A, Lewith GT. The Buteyko breathing technique for asthma: a review. Complement Ther Med. 2005 Mar;13(1):41-6.

13034.  Busse JW, Heaton G, Wu P, Wilson KR, Mills EJ. Disclosure of natural product use to primary care physicians: a cross-sectional survey of naturopathic clinic attendees. Mayo Clin Proc. 2005 May;80(5):616-23.

13035.  Byrne M. Reintegrating the mind and body. AORN J. 2005 Apr;81(4):777-8.

13036.  Cahalin LP, Hernandez ED, Matsuo Y. Diaphragmatic breathing training: further investigation needed. Phys Ther. 2005 Apr;85(4):369-70; author reply 370-3.

13037.  Cao Y, Fu ZD, Wang F, Liu HY, Han R. Anti-angiogenic activity of resveratrol, a natural compound from medicinal plants. J Asian Nat Prod Res. 2005 Jun;7(3):205-13.

13038.  Cassileth BR, Vickers AJ. High prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine use among cancer patients: implications for research and clinical care. J Clin Oncol. 2005 Apr 20;23(12):2590-2.

13039.  Chernyak GV, Sessler DI. Perioperative acupuncture and related techniques. Anesthesiology. 2005 May;102(5):1031-49; quiz 1077-8. Review.

13040.  Chhetri DR. Medicinal plants used as antipyretic agents by the traditional healers of Darjeeling Himalayas. Indian J Tradl Knowledge 2004;3(3):271-5.

13041.  Childs JD, Fritz JM, Flynn TW. Treatments for back pain. Ann Intern Med. 2005 May 17;142(10):874.

13042.  Ciardella AP. Ocular side effects from herbal medicines and nutritional supplements. Am J Ophthalmol. 2005 May;139(5):950; author reply 950.

13043.  Dash GK, Kar DM, Patro Ch P. Studies on antimicrobial and pediculoside activity of leaf essential oil from murraya koenigii spreng.  Aryavaidyan. 2005 Feb-Apr; 18(3):173-175.

13044.  Debnath PK, Bhattacharya TK, Acharya SB. Effect of PGE, on blood 5-HT turnover in peripheral tissues in rats. Indian Journal of Physiology and Allied Sciences. 1994 Oct; 48(4): 174-8. 

13045.  Deng Y, Nicholson RA. Antifungal properties of surangin B, a coumarin from Mammea longifolia. Planta Med. 2005 Apr;71(4):364-5. 

13046.  Diamond JA, Diamond WJ. Common functional bowel problems. What do homeopathy, Chinese medicine and nutrition have to offer? Adv Nurse Pract. 2005 May;13(5):31-4, 72. Review.

13047.  Dillard JN, Knapp S. Complementary and alternative pain therapy in the emergency department. Emerg Med Clin North Am. 2005 May;23(2):529-49. Review.

13048.  Dunn JD, Cannon HE, Lewis T, Shane-McWhorter L. Development of a complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) pharmacy and therapeutics (P&T) subcommittee and CAM guide for providers. J Manag Care Pharm. 2005 Apr;11(3):252-8.

13049.  Dutta RK, Mendiratta OP, Tiwari VD, Sylva PLKD. A study of acupuncture therapy in leprous neuritis. Medical Journal Armed Forces India. 1987 Oct; 43(4): 295-8.

13050.  Eisenberg DM. The Institute of Medicine report on complementary and alternative medicine in the United States--personal reflections on its content and implications. Altern Ther Health Med. 2005 May-Jun;11(3):10-5. Review.

13051.  Elden H, Ladfors L, Olsen MF, Ostgaard HC, Hagberg H. Effects of acupuncture and stabilising exercises as adjunct to standard treatment in pregnant women with pelvic girdle pain: randomised single blind controlled trial. BMJ. 2005 Apr 2;330(7494):761.

13052.   Eliopoulos C. Complementary approaches to hypertension. Director. 2005 Spring;13(2):102-3.

13053.   Farvis RA. Ethical considerations in spiritual care. Int J Palliat Nurs. 2005 Apr;11(4):189.

13054.   Gabbard GO. Mind, brain, and personality disorders. Am J Psychiatry. 2005 Apr;162(4):648-55. Review.

13055.   Good M, Anderson GC, Ahn S, Cong X, Stanton-Hicks M. Relaxation and music    reduce pain following intestinal surgery. Res Nurs Health. 2005 Jun;28(3):240-51. 

13056.   Graham RE, Ahn AC, Davis RB, O'Connor BB, Eisenberg DM, Phillips RS. Use of complementary and alternative medical therapies among racial and ethnic minority adults: results from the 2002 National Health Interview Survey. J Natl Med Assoc. 2005 Apr;97(4):535-45.

13057.   Hall M, Nazir N. Quantification of the scientific research in the United States about popular herbal remedies referenced on PubMed. Altern Ther Health Med. 2005 May-Jun;11(3):34-7. Review. 

13058.   Hana G, Bar-Sela G, Zhana D, Mashiach T, Robinson E. The use of complementary and alternative therapies by cancer patients in northern Israel. Isr Med Assoc J. 2005 Apr;7(4):243-7.

13059.   Haraldsson K, Fridlund B, Baigi A, Marklund B. The self-reported health condition of women after their participation in a stress management programme: a pilot study. Health Soc Care Community. 2005 May;13(3):224-30.

13060.   Haristoy X, Fahey JW, Scholtus I, Lozniewski A. Evaluation of the antimicrobial effects of several isothiocyanates on Helicobacter pylori. Planta Med. 2005 Apr;71(4):326-30.

13061.   Hazra J, Srikanth N, Chopra KK. Holistic approach to the management of diabetes mellitus with classical and folk plant drugs. Health Administrator. 1996 Jul & 1997 Dec; 7 & 8(1 & 2): 131-7.

13062.   Hernandez-Reif M, Field T, Ironson G, Beutler J, Vera Y, Hurley J, Fletcher MA, Schanberg S, Kuhn C, Fraser M. Natural killer cells and lymphocytes increase in women with breast cancer following massage therapy. Int J Neurosci. 2005 Apr;115(4):495-510.

13063.  Hillsman D, Sharma V. Yoga and pneumothorax. Chest. 2005 May;127(5):1863.

13064.  Hilpert KF, Kris-Etherton PM, West SG. Lipid response to a low-fat diet with or without soy is modified by C-reactive protein status in moderately hypercholesterolemic adults. J Nutr. 2005 May;135(5):1075-9.

13065.   Hong J, Ishihara K, Zee O, Ohuchi K. Induction of apoptosis by apicularen A in human promyelocytic leukemia cell line HL-60. Planta Med. 2005 Apr;71(4):306-12.

13066.   Hsu YL, Kuo YC, Kuo PL, Ng LT, Kuo YH, Lin CC. Apoptotic effects of extract from Antrodia camphorata fruiting bodies in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines. Cancer Lett. 2005 Apr 18;221(1):77-89.

13067.  Hyman MA. Quality in healthcare: asking the right questions. The next ten years: the role of CAM in the "quality cure". Altern Ther Health Med. 2005 May-Jun;11(3):18-20, 79. Review.

13068.   Hyodo I, Amano N, Eguchi K, Narabayashi M, Imanishi J, Hirai M, Nakano T, Takashima S.  Nationwide survey on complementary and alternative medicine in cancer patients in Japan. J Clin Oncol. 2005 Apr 20;23(12):2645-54.

13069.   Jones AY, Dean E, Scudds RJ. Effectiveness of a community-based Tai Chi program and implications for public health initiatives. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2005 Apr;86(4):619-25.

13070.   Ka MH, Choi EH, Chun HS, Lee KG. Antioxidative activity of volatile extracts isolated from Angelica tenuissimae roots, peppermint leaves, pine needles, and sweet flag leaves. J Agric Food Chem. 2005 May 18;53(10):4124-9.

13071.  Kabat-Zinn J. Jon Kabat-Zinn, PhD. Bringing mindfulness to medicine. Interview by Karolyn A. Gazella. Altern Ther Health Med. 2005 May-Jun;11(3):56-64.

13072.  Kang HC, Shin KK, Kim KK, Youn BB. The effects of the acupuncture treatment for smoking cessation in high school student smokers. Yonsei Med J. 2005 Apr 30;46(2):206-12.

13073.   Kim S, Hohrmann JL, Clark S, Munoz KN, Braun JE, Doshi A, Radeos MS, Camargo CA Jr. A multicenter study of complementary and alternative medicine usage among ED patients. Acad Emerg Med. 2005 Apr;12(4):377-80.

13074.  Lane MR. Creativity and spirituality in nursing: implementing art in healing. Holist Nurs Pract. 2005 May-Jun;19(3):122-5. Review. 

13075.  Lee H, Ernst E. Acupuncture analgesia during surgery: a systematic review. Pain. 2005 Apr;114(3):511-7. Review.

13076.  Lee J, Jung E, Park J, Jung K, Lee S, Hong S, Park J, Park E, Kim J, Park S, Park D.   Anti-inflammatory effects of magnolol and honokiol are mediated through inhibition of the downstream pathway of MEKK-1 in NF-kappaB activation signaling. Planta Med. 2005 Apr;71(4):338-43.

13077.   Lee OK, Chung YF, Chan MF, Chan WM. Music and its effect on the physiological responses and anxiety levels of patients receiving mechanical ventilation: a pilot study. J Clin Nurs. 2005 May;14(5):609-20.

13078.   Lindquist R, Tracy MF, Savik K, Watanuki S. Regional use of complementary and alternative therapies by critical care nurses. Crit Care Nurse. 2005 Apr;25(2):63-4, 66-8, 70-2 passim.

13079.   Losier A, Taylor B, Fernandez CV. Use of alternative therapies by patients presenting to a pediatric emergency department. J Emerg Med. 2005 Apr;28(3):267-71.

13080.   Manheimer E, White A, Berman B, Forys K, Ernst E. Meta-analysis: acupuncture for low back pain. Ann Intern Med. 2005 Apr 19;142(8):651-63. Review. Erratum in: Ann Intern Med. 2005 Jun 7;142(11):950-1.

13081.   Marcus DM, Snodgrass WR. Do no harm: avoidance of herbal medicines during pregnancy. Obstet Gynecol. 2005 May;105(5 Pt 1):1119-22. Review.

13082.   Martel D, Bussieres JF, Theoret Y, Lebel D, Kish S, Moghrabi A, Laurier C. Use of alternative and complementary therapies in children with cancer. Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2005 Jun 15;44(7):660-8.

13083.   McBurnett K, Raine A, Stouthamer-Loeber M, Loeber R, Kumar AM, Kumar M, Lahey BB. Mood and hormone responses to psychological challenge in adolescent males with conduct problems. Biol Psychiatry. 2005 May 15;57(10):1109-16.

13084.   Mechanick JI. The rational use of dietary supplements and nutraceuticals in clinical medicine. Mt Sinai J Med. 2005 May;72(3):161-5.

13085.   Melancon B, Miller LH. Massage therapy versus traditional therapy for low back pain relief: implications for holistic nursing practice. Holist Nurs Pract. 2005 May-Jun;19(3):116-21.

13086.  Molassiotis A, Fernadez-Ortega P, Pud D, Ozden G, Scott JA, Panteli V, Margulies A, Browall M, Magri M, Selvekerova S, Madsen E, Milovics L, Bruyns I, Gudmundsdottir G, Hummerston S, Ahmad AM, Platin N, Kearney N, Patiraki E.  Use of complementary and alternative medicine in cancer patients: a European survey. Ann Oncol. 2005 Apr;16(4):655-63.

13087.  Monti DA, Yang J. Complementary medicine in chronic cancer care. Semin Oncol. 2005 Apr;32(2):225-31. Review.

13088.  O'Connor PJ, Pronk NP, Tan A, Whitebird RR.  Characteristics of adults who use prayer as an alternative therapy. Am J Health Promot. 2005 May-Jun;19(5):369-75.

13089.   Ohye H, Fukata S, Kanoh M, Kubota S, Kuma K, Miyauchi A, Sugawara M.  Thyrotoxicosis caused by weight-reducing herbal medicines. Arch Intern Med. 2005 Apr 25;165(8):831-4.

13090.   Pariente J, White P, Frackowiak RS, Lewith G. Expectancy and belief modulate the neuronal substrates of pain treated by acupuncture. Neuroimage. 2005 May 1;25(4):1161-7.

13091.   Pero RW, Amiri A, Sheng Y, Welther M, Rich M. Formulation and in vitro/in vivo evaluation of combining DNA repair and immune enhancing nutritional supplements. Phytomedicine. 2005 Apr;12(4):255-63.

13092.  Pohodenko-Chudakova IO. Acupuncture analgesia and its application in cranio-maxillofacial surgical procedures. J Craniomaxillofac Surg. 2005 Apr;33(2):118-22.

13093.   Poss J, Pierce R, Prieto V. Herbal remedies used by selected migrant farmworkers in El Paso, Texas. J Rural Health. 2005 Spring;21(2):187-91.

13094.   Prema P. Antimicrobial activity of selected medicinal plants. J Ecobiol 2004;16(5):333-7. 

13095.   Rai NP, Mishra BK, Seth V. Role of berberis aristata in the treatment of infective hepatitis with special reference to its antioxidant properties. Aryavaidyan. 2005 Feb-Apr; 18(3):157-161.

13096.  Ramakrishnan S. Role for alternative system of medicine : our experience. JIRA. 1994 Oct-Dec; 2(4): 63-5.

13097.  Reilly AM. Massage therapy: integration with traditional medicine. Adv Nurse Pract. 2005 May;13(5):37-8, 40, 42. Review.

13098.   Reuter-Lorenz PA, Lustig C. Brain aging: reorganizing discoveries about the aging mind. Curr Opin Neurobiol. 2005 Apr;15(2):245-51. Review.

13099.  Richard CL, Jurgens TM. Effects of natural health products on blood pressure. Ann Pharmacother. 2005 Apr;39(4):712-20.

13100.  Roy S, Khanna S, Shah H, Rink C, Phillips C, Preuss H, Subbaraju GV, Trimurtulu G, Krishnaraju AV, Bagchi M, Bagchi D, Sen CK. Human genome screen to identify the genetic basis of the anti-inflammatory effects of Boswellia in microvascular endothelial cells. DNA Cell Biol. 2005 Apr;24(4):244-55.

13101.  Russmann S, Lauterburg BH, Barguil Y, Choblet E, Cabalion P, Rentsch K, Wenk M. Traditional aqueous kava extracts inhibit cytochrome P450 1A2 in humans: Protective effect against environmental carcinogens? Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2005 May;77(5):453-4.

13102.  Sabina AB, Williams AL, Wall HK, Bansal S, Chupp G, Katz DL. Yoga intervention for adults with mild-to-moderate asthma: a pilot study. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2005 May;94(5):543-8.

13103.   Sampson F, Visser A. Creative writing in health care: a branch of complementary medicine. Patient Educ Couns. 2005 Apr;57(1):1-4. Review.

13104.  Schneider RH, Alexander CN, Staggers F, Rainforth M, Salerno JW, Hartz A, Arndt S, Barnes VA, Nidich SI.  Long-term effects of stress reduction on mortality in persons > or = 55 years of age with systemic hypertension. Am J Cardiol. 2005 May 1;95(9):1060-4.

13105.   Shanahan M. Holistic nursing theory: connecting heart & mind in practice. Beginnings. 2005 Spring;25(2):1, 12-3.

13106.   Sharma V. Diaphragmatic breathing training: further investigation needed. Phys Ther. 2005 Apr;85(4):366-7; author reply 367-8.

13107.  Shekelle PG, Morton SC, Suttorp MJ, Buscemi N, Friesen C; Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.  Challenges in systematic reviews of complementary and alternative medicine topics. Ann Intern Med. 2005 Jun 21;142(12 Pt 2):1042-7. Review.

13108.   Sridevi K, Rao KPV, Rao K PV. Yoga practice and menstrual distress. Journal of Indian Academy of Applied Psychology. 1996 Jan-Jul; 22(1-2): 47-53.

13109.  Sylvestre M, Legault J, Dufour D, Pichette A. Chemical composition and anticancer activity of leaf essential oil of Myrica gale L. Phytomedicine. 2005 Apr;12(4):299-304.

13110.   Timimi S. Dietary approaches to treatment could have a major public health impact. Ment Health Today. 2005 May;:21.

13111.  Venkataraman R, Palaniappan R. Phytochemical and Microbiological studies on some common weeds of medicinal importance. Int J Chem Sci 2004;2(1);113-5.

13112.   Vigne J. Meditation and mental health.  Indian Journal of Clinical Psychology. 1997 Mar; 24(1): 46-51.

13113.   Wang C, Roubenoff R, Lau J, Kalish R, Schmid CH, Tighiouart H, Rones R, Hibberd PL. Effect of Tai Chi in adults with rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatology (Oxford). 2005 May;44(5):685-7.

13114.   Weber DO. Mainstreaming of alternative medicine. Health Administrator. 1996 Jul & 1997 Dec; 7 & 8(1 & 2): 26-40.

13115.   West C. Birth story comments. RCM Midwives. 2005 Apr;8(4):174.

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13117.  Williams KA, Petronis J, Smith D, Goodrich D, Wu J, Ravi N, Doyle EJ Jr, Gregory Juckett R, Munoz Kolar M, Gross R, Steinberg L. Effect of Iyengar yoga therapy for chronic low back pain. Pain. 2005 May;115(1-2):107-17. 

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